Please Don't Eat the Artwork

ART WITH MS K


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Fluorescent Stamped Robots

Hello! I started this project forever ago with my 2nd graders but between snow days and sick days, it has taken a looooong time to finish. Now that all the classes have completed their artwork I am so excited to share these amazing stamped robots with you! The first day we began by talking about robots. We talked about how robots are used in the world today and how they are used in fictional stories and movies. We talked about how robots are made up of geometric shapes. Then, we dipped and stamped.

I was running really low on black tempera paint so I decided to see how these would look with white paint on black paper. And I must say – I love ’em! Instead of using watercolors or tempera cakes, we used Sax Versa Temp Fluorescent colors.

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I have been using this paint for everything lately – it looks good on black paper, white paper, and even clay! Students also found the glowy neon colors enchanting when they painted their robots.

To top this project off, each student did a little bit of creative writing about their robot. I am always so tickled by the zany things that kids come up with when they are writing.

Great job 2nd graders!

❤ Mrs. K

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Jellyfish

The idea for this lesson comes from Deep Space Sparkle. 

Students began by mixing tints and shades of blue to create a gradient value scale. The next day, everyone could choose either small or big bubble wrap. Aqua paint was carefully applied to the bubbly side with a paintbrush.

Students were encouraged to work together to flip their bubble wrap onto their gradient paper to “print” bubbles. They gently pressed down and were absolutely amazed at their bubble prints!

The next week, we talked about how to show form in a drawing by creating shadows adn highlights. Students were challenged to create a sphere with a light source as well as a jelly dome shape.

After practicing with pencil, students used chalk pastels to create colorful jellies and bubbles.

The last day, everything was assembled. The colorful jellies were cut out. Scraps of tissue-paper tie die paper were used to create the tentacles. Students had the option of curling them or leaving them flat. Seaweed and kelp was added to the background with oil pastels to create a sense of depth.

This is definitely one of those projects that I will be doing year after year. The process was so much fun and the products are AWESOME! There are so many different techniques and a lot of vocabulary encompassed in this project — it was perfect for 5th grade!

What is in the middle of a jellyfish?

…….

.

……

A JELLYBUTTON!

❤ Mrs. K


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Geometric Designs by Grade 3

The idea for this lesson comes from Mrs. Knight’s Smartest Artsists. Thanks, Hope! 

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Teacher Sample 

Third graders created these super cool geometric design works of art and learned some new art-making techniques. We began by using bleeding tissue paper to make tie-dye paper. I have really been digging this technique lately!

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The results are just so beautiful! Once the papers were dry, we used used dots and rulers to create line segments. Students connected their line segments to create geometric shapes. Kids learn about minerals in 3rd grade so trying to create a mineral-like design was a great science connection. The next class time, students colored in some of their geometric shapes (to make it look kind of 3D) and used a needle and thread to sew into their paper.

The sewing part was pretty difficult for most kids. The hardest part was figuring out how to tie a knot. I reminded the kids to try their best and just making one line with yarn is still an accomplishment. Ultimately, every student agreed that they felt very proud to learn a new skill.

Nice work 3rd graders!

❤ Mrs. K


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Kawaii Shrinky Dinks

Every school year there is some new trend that today’s youths become obsessed with. Silly bands, One Direction, Pokemon Go, Minecraft . . . the list goes on and on. This year my 5th grade girls are absolutely obsessed with Kawaii – the culture of cuteness originating in Japan. They have clothes and accessories and school supplies. They are Kawaii crazy! And to be honest, this is a trend I am also on board with because it is so dang cute. I purchased a few drawing books on Amazon  and there are kids in my classroom almost every morning who want to practice drawing Kawaii. Its awesome!

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So I decided to do Kawaii Shrinky-Dinks with art club and another group of students. Shrinky-Dinks is a plastic sheet that you can draw on and when you put it in a toaster oven, the paper shrinks in size and grows in thickness.  I don’t have any picture of the ones my students made but here are my examples. First, I drew my design onto sketch paper. I placed the transparent Shrinky-Dink plastic over and used Sharpie to outline. I colored everything in with colored pencil. Then I cut out the designs.

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I used a hole punch to make holes so that these can be charms. They were carefully placed on a flattened brown lunch sack (rough side up!) and put into a 350 degree toaster oven for a couple minutes. It is really cool to see them shrink! You have to put the rough side up because they like to bend and the smooth side will stick to itself and become ruined.

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Twisteez Wire is used at the end to create a charm/keychain/ornament etc. (Please don’t mind the non-Kawaii psychedelic stegosaurus that snuck in there) These were such a huge hit with students and despite being rather crafty, a huge hit with me too!

❤ Mrs. K


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Emoji Prints

Happy New Year! This school year seems to have flown by. I can’t believe it is already halfway over! I have been having a very relaxing break and as I am starting to get prepared for getting back into the swing of things, I figured I would share this home run project inspired by Teach and Shoot Blog.

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So it has been a while since I have done printmaking with Styrofoam like this. Last year I ended up rage-quitting printmaking with 4th grade because my very well planned out lesson ended up being waaayyyy too complicated. I wanted to be ambitious with the lesson this year but have the kids create something very simple. I think that is the key to printmaking — keep the subject matter simple because the technical aspect can be very difficult. We began by creating an analogous background by making tissue-paper tie dye paper. Students chose colors next to each other on the color wheel and used water to make the tissue paper bleed. I have really been digging this technique lately!

Next, students sketched their Emoji idea. I told them no poop emoji. When we get back from break I am planning on displaying these in the hallways and I simply can’t imagine my admin’s reaction to me hanging up pictures of poop on the walls. So NO POOP EMOJIS!! They pretty much got to choose any other face emoji that they wanted. After they sketched their idea, they used a yogurt cup to trace a circle onto a piece of foam. they used hatching and cross hatching techniques to create contrast in their carving.

I thought a lot about how I wanted the actual printing lesson to go. I have done printmaking in a variety of ways over the past several years. I have used a variety of ink colors and tempera paints. I have had kids roll the ink onto phone books and onto lunch trays. I have had kids print one time, three times, or as many times as possible. I have had a set of supplies per table, per student, or just at one table and called kids over. All of these methods have their pros and cons and really depend on the age and dynamic of the group of kids. This year I figured we would just go for it and each table got two sets of supplies: a small tray, a brayer for rolling ink, and black printing ink to print 4 times on the same piece of paper.

I’ve got to say — I was absolutely astonished at how lovely the process and products turned out! I was really apprehensive (which I even admitted to my students!) about this project being successful. I told my students that I did not want them to feel discouraged about making art. I wanted them to TRY YOUR BEST. Whatever the magical combination was, printmaking went wonderfully.

I am rethinking my dislike for printmaking after seeing these amazing creations!

Great job 4th graders! 🙂

❤ Mrs. K


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Tissue Paper Tie Dye Notans

Art club ROCKED this project!

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Teacher Sample

It has been a while since I have taught Notans and since this was with art club kids, I really wanted it to be a multi-media project. So we started off “tie-dyeing” our paper with tissue paper.

I showed students a PowerPoint about notans so they could start thinking about their design. The next week, they received this worksheet to help them create the design. Each student got a black piece of construction paper and traced a circle. They cut and glued their pieces to create symmetry and negative space. Then, they added details with silver and black sharpies.

Great job Art Club!

❤ Mrs. K


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Little Trees

First graders learned all about color mixing, shapes, texture, and stamping for this project. We began by doing carousel painting with tints and shades of green and orange.

The next week, students created a purple background by mixing blue and pink. They used a fork to scratch texture into the wet paint.

That did not take up the entire 45 minute block so we were also able to start tracing and cutting circles from the tints and shades papers.

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The last day, we assembled everything together. Students overlapped their circles and glued them down with just a dot of liquid glue.

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Then, they used cardboard and marker caps to dip and stamp tree trunks, branches, and snow!

These are so sweet!

Great job first graders!

❤ Mrs. K


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Illuminated Manuscript Inspired Letters

5th graders learned all about Illuminated Manuscripts   for this project. They were fascinated by the process of creating vellum paper from animal skins and adding real gold onto the pages of books to make them ‘illuminate.’ We began by sketching a design that featured the first letter of their first or last name. Students were encouraged to add a decorative border and personal symbolism or designs that would add visual interest to their letter.

Next, students copied their design onto a piece of painting paper. They traced over their lines with permanent markers and colored in some areas with crayons.

They painted the negative space around their letter with metallic tempera paint. They could choose from gold, silver, or copper. They filled in the rest with watercolors.

I am so impressed with how beautiful these turned out. The kids really put a lot of time and though into them and the personalization and symbolism made for an overall very engaging project.


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Vibrant Villages

This Cassie Stephens inspired project  was a huge hit with 4th graders! We began by sketching houses. We talked about variety, geometric shapes, repetition, and contrast.

For their final draft, students chose 10-15 houses to draw onto painting paper. They traced over their lines with black crayon and colored in the houses with Crayola Twistables. Next, we used magenta, yellow, and turquoise liquid watercolors. Painting over the houses colored with crayons created a resist effect.

The colors mixed together to make a beautiful tie-dye rainbow. Kids got to sprinkle salt too which created a lovely texture.


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A Rainbow of My Own

As we are gearing up to put work together for our Artome art show, I realized that i completely forgot to post about first grade’s rainy day portraits. These were inspired by this blog post from Grade Onderful. I thought these would be absolutely charming for the art show and a great project to get students back into good drawing, cutting, and painting habits.

We began by drawing a rainy day landscape with white oil pastels. Students drew a horizontal line in the middle of their paper and created spirals on the bottom half and diagonal lines on the top half. Then, they painted over their lines with black, purple, and blue watercolors. They were amazed at the “magic” resist technique!

While they were painting, I called them up one by one to take their picture holding an umbrella. My assistant principal was so helpful to print all of the color photos for me — thanks Kerri-Ann!

The next week, students cut out their “selves” and glued it to their rainy background. Then, they drew and colored a rainbow which was cut out and placed above the horizon line. I think these will look terrific in the Artome frames for the art show!

The art show is Monday, December 4th from 4:30-6:30. Artwork is $25 cash or check and we will be offering reproductions as well as originals this year. Hope to see you there!

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❤ Mrs. K