Please Don't Eat the Artwork

ART WITH MS K


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Paper Bag Tree Sculptures

The idea for this project came from an Instagram post by @iteachart2004. Here is my teacher sample which I absolutely LOVE and am quite proud of:

Art club loved making these sculptural trees. We began with a piece of cardboard and a paper bag. The cardboard was cut to the size of the bottom of the bag. Once placed inside, the bag was twisted. The kids cut into the top and twisted the pieces to make ‘branches.’ 

After sculpting their tree, students used tempera paint to paint the base. Some kids painted the branches and quickly realized that it made the sculpture droop because it was too heavy. Next time I do this project we will make sure to just paint the base ūüôā 

The next art club session, students used tissue paper to create leaves on their trees. They also began to draw and cut out their pop-up details. 

My example was fall themed and my students ran in all different directions with their own projects. Some kids made winter scenes, some made magical fairytale trees, or trees inspired by stories and mythology.

I can’t wait to do this again in the spring with the next group of Art Club kiddos. I am thinking that we will make cherry-blossom trees!

‚̧ Mrs. K 


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Important People Portraits

This project AMAZING. I know I say that about all of the artwork my students make but this one is for real you guys. The process for this is based on a project from @arteiwthmrs.e. I have used rainbow scratch paper with grade 4 in the past and is is always a huge hit. I thought it would be even more fun to make it ourselves!

On the first day of the unit, we talked about portraits. Students created a sketch of a self-portrait and a sketch of a portrait of someone who is special or important to them.

Next, we had a nice chat about the color wheel and students were introduced to analogous colors. They used crayons to color hard on two pieces of white paper. After their paper was filled up with color, they painted black tempera right on top. They flippety-flopped their paintbrush over and used the handle side to scratch their portraits into the paint, revealing the beautiful colors underneath.

Students finished up the project by writing a few sentences about why they are special and why the person they chose is important to them. As always, the writing the kids produced is pure gold. Their sentiments are so sweet and quirky.

Some classes got to play a fun critique game called Criticket when they finished their work.¬†This game really reinforced the positive thinking mindset of this project and allowed the kids to connect with each other and their artwork in a new way. One of my goals as an educator is to teach not only my curriculum but also character development and empathy as well. The reason I like this project so much is because it was driven by positive thinking about the self and others. In today’s would more than ever, that is something we all need.

‚̧ Mrs. K


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Criticket

The idea for this critique games comes from mskitlang.com. So far, I have only played this with 4th graders when they completed their Important People Portraits. I am hoping to play with more grade levels throughout the school year.

Students started off by looking at a PowerPoint introducing the game. We watched this video which is a pretty good introduction to art critiques for young kids. Then, I explained what each ticket means:

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Students played a practice round with artwork:

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The practice round allowed students to see how the game is played. They quickly realized that this is an opinion game and that not everyone will have the exact same answer. In fact, there is no right or wrong answer! I gave the instructions. . .

  • Place your sketch with your final artwork.
  • Working in teams of two, you will play Criticket with your classmate‚Äôs artwork.
  • Remember: there is not RIGHT or WRONG answer ‚Äď this is an OPINION game.
  • Be honest about your opinion, don‚Äôt pick something just because others did, be original!
  • Not everyone has to get a ticket, if you don’t get one it doesn’t mean nobody liked your artwork. This game isn’t about “liking” the artwork, it is supposed to make you think deeper.

. . . and then we got started. Students placed their sketch with their final artwork. They teamed up and did a preliminary walk-around.

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After they viewed each of their classmate’s artwork, they started placing their tickets.

 

When the team is out of tickets, they have to sit back down. When everyone is sitting down, we come back together as a class and discuss. Students get to share why they placed their tickets where they did. The conversation is positive and uplifting, one group of students even applauded for each other.¬†Overall this activity was a great way for students to support one another and show empathy and kindness. I can’t want to do it with another group!

‚̧ Mrs. K


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Emoji Pillows in Art Club

Art club kids really enjoyed making emoji pillows. I did a similar project a couple years ago with art club but it was a lit smaller and more difficult to sew. This time around, instead of felt, we used Smart-Fab crafting fabric. It was so easy to work with and it is so soft! I traced out giant circles on yellow fabric for the students to cut out and sew together.

Once they finished sewing their circles together (with a little bit left open) they flipped it inside out and used cotton fluff to stuff. They they sewed the gap closed and designed their emoji.

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Red, black, blue, and white fabric was used for the details. It was super easy to glue together with regular ol’ school glue.

These turned out great! I liked the process and product for this project. The kids felt empowered to learn how to sew and create their very own pillow. It was a new skill for most and I am very proud of all of their hard work and perseverance. Way to go art club!

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‚̧ Mrs. K


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Activities for the Last Day of Art Class

It can be a challenge to plan the last few weeks of art lessons. You want to do something that is engaging and educational but fun. It is the end of the year after all! This year I did a bunch of different one or two day lessons and then on the very last day of art I had students do Genius Hour or The Day the Crayons Quit. I wanted to create a blog post about these and some of my other favorite last day lessons.

Water Graffiti
I have talked about this one before. At my old school, I had an enormous and mostly empty courtyard outside of my classroom. It was perfect for doing Water Graffiti. Basically, we would take big cups of water and paint brushes outside and paint with water. This was not only exceptionally fun but also provided a nice little science lesson about evaporation and the water cycle.

I would give challenges of who could paint the biggest ____ or who could work together to create a ______, who could write the entire alphabet without it evaporating. I haven’t done this in a few years but it is super fun on the last day, especially if it is nice out!

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The Dot
This activity is perfect if the weather isn’t great or if you have a group that you just don’t¬† trust to paint outside with water. I read¬†The Dot¬†to the class and put big pieces of butcher paper on each table. Students use a variety of art supplies to create their own dots. Usually there is an episode of Magic School Bus playing too ūüôā

The Day the Crayons Quit
I will never tire of reading The Day the Crayons Quit to students. It is hilarious and so is the sequel. We begin by reading one or both and then do a step-by-step to create the crayon craft. This project is definitely more on the crafty side which I often try to avoid but it is so cute that I deem it OK for the last day of art class. I did this project earlier this year with the classes I had on Halloween because it was also Book Character Day. It is a perfect one day lesson for an exciting school day!

Each kiddo gets a popsicle stick and we create the crayon details, the name of the crayon color, and the face with sharpie. Then, they color it in. Next, students pick a pipe cleaner that most matches their crayon’s color and they cut it in half. I hot clue the pipe cleaners to the back to create pose-able arms and legs.

Genius Hour
“Ms. Katzin, why is it called genius hour if specials is only 45 minutes?” one sassy yet observant student asks. The answer is because this is an idea I borrowed from the kindergarten team. Out at carpool I started noticing kindergartners with amazing creations that they were designing and building during Genius Hour – an hour devoted to creativity. I am absolutely over the moon about this process and wish I had thought of doing it earlier in the year.

Basically – Genius Hour is where you can make whatever you want out of the materials provided. The creative ideas the kids come up with is astonishing. Here are the materials they could use: Pipe cleaners, scrapbook paper, scrap paper, felt, string, beads, paper cups, straws, receipt paper, mat board, scissors, staples, tape, glue. I explained the supplies to them and went over some basic rules and procedures and then they got to work.

One very cool and popular item was the Corru-Gator which crimps the paper. I only had one so the kids had to bring their paper to me but I plan on ordering a bunch more for next year.

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Check out these amazing creations!

I ended up placing a few more items out like bulletin board boarders and painted paper scraps as things got depleted. I am already starting to collect random knick-knacks to put in the Genius Hour bin for next year. I am hoping to do this more frequently than just the last day of art class.

Hope everyone has a great summer! See you in the fall!

‚̧ Mrs. Katzin

 


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Geode Agates

I saw this project all over Instagram and knew it would be perfect for the last few weeks of school! The main inspiration came from @artwithmrs.e and her tutorial was super helpful. We began by looking at different geodes ad agate slices. Students connected this to their classroom learning because they learn about gems and minerals in 3rd grade.

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I found that this project worked best step-by-step so I did a demo on the doc cam and everyone followed along. We began by painting an oval with water. Then, students used analogous colors to create concentric rings going inward with water color paint. They sprinkled salt and outlined their shape with metallic tempera paint to finish it off. These are from one 4th grade and several 3rd grade classes. Nice work guys!

‚̧ Mrs. K


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Metallic City

This project was so much fun! It was a spin off of this cityscape artwork. I wanted to try out some metallic art supplies and we used every single last thing for these. Here is the supply list:

The first day, students looked at pictures of buildings and cities and designed their own city using a variety of shapes and overlapping.

Everyone traced over their lines with metallic sharpies and colored in their buildings with metallic crayons and colored pencils.

 

That took up the next couple of classes. Once most kids had colored in most of their design, I showed they how to paint concentric circles in the sky. They had to think and plan very carefully so that their picture had depth from overlapping.

 

The kids did a fantastic job!

 

‚̧ Mrs. K


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Ceramic ‘Ornaments’ & Valentines

Now that we are in the second semester of the year, I have a brand new batch of art club kids. Their first project was to create ceramic valentines. I did a similar project with last semester’s art club kids. They made ‘ornaments.’ I have that in quotations because I will not create religious artwork in a public school – there were several non-Christian kids in the class. Also my Jewish mom would have an absolute kanipshin fit if she thought I was having my students make religious-based artwork so I promise to y’all and to you Mom, that these are¬†not specifically¬†ornaments. ūüôā

Anyhow, we began with a slab that students could pretty much decorate however they wanted. In the winter, most of them were created with the intention of being given as a gift so many of the kids made them personalized. For valentines day, they traces a heart template and then added details with texture or building little things on.

After all of the pieces went through the kiln, students colored on them with crayons and then painted with India Ink or watercolor to create a lovely resist effect.

They twisted colorful wires on to hang up.

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Aren’t they super cute?!

Art club is currently working on panda paintings right now so be on the lookout for a blog post about those soon ūüôā

‚̧ Mrs.¬† K