Please Don't Eat the Artwork

ART WITH MS K


Leave a comment

Stitching and Pets in Art Club

This Cassie Stephens-inspired project was challenging but fun for my art club kiddos. We began by painting a piece of 12×12 cardboard with tempera paint. I showed students how to create a gradient by blending colors.

Then, students filled out the practice page to kind of get in the mindset of stitching.

IMG_20170307_150413

It was a little difficult for them to grasp the concept of creating these 2D lines in 3D space at first but with a little bit of practice, they got the hang of it. The square design was certainly the easiest but I had many students challenge themselves to create one of the more difficult designs. On the back of the cardboard, we traced a plate and created 16 notches.

IMG_20170216_151218

IMG_20170216_151250.jpg

There was a lot of peer support that happened especially when I loudly declared that I would not be tying any more knots for anybody. Students could choose any color of yarn they wanted to create their design.

As students completed their stitching, they began a quick and easy pet portrait project. I like to bookend really challenging projects with simple ones sometimes to keep motivation and morale up. The stitching proved to be SUPER challenging for some kids so I figured it was time to take it easy with a simple drawing and painting project based on this lesson.  One of my more observant and sassy 5th graders asked “isn’t that for the little kids?!” But they enjoyed it anyway 😛

Not everyone completed the pet portraits but the nice thing about art club is that the students have the memory and motivation to work on their projects for long stretches of time. They will get a chance to finish as we move into our next project of emoji plushies!

IMG_20170310_152949_372

 

 

 

 

 


Leave a comment

Pattern Pets

This project is based on a lesson from Mini Matisse. My 1st and 3rd graders loved creating pattern pet sculptures! We began with a piece of 6×4 card stock paper, colored pencils, and permanent markers. Students drew patterns with the markers and colored with the colored pencils.

The next week, each student got a handy handout that showed how to draw different animal’s heads and tails. Students did not have to choose from the handout, they could create their own pattern pet too. The handout was useful to get them started though.

IMG_20170301_095518

Students used another little piece of card stock to draw, trace and color their pet’s head and tail. Then they cut and glued it to the body. They created a 3D pop up body by cutting an arch shape in the folded paper.

They are sooooooooo stinkin’ cute!!! All of the kids were really into this project and they turned out great. This will definitely be one that I come back to again and again — some 2nd graders even requested to make these sometime this year so you might see them again!

❤ 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 


Leave a comment

Ceramic Animal Faces

This project is amazing!!!!! I love giving students the opportunity to have their own choice and voice in art and this one was supper successful with that. On the first day, students used handouts, drawing books, and iPads to sketch an animal face.

On the second day, 3rd graders cut out the shape of their animal’s face and scratched and attached to add details. They could choose any animal the wanted and had to work really hard to identify and utilize the shapes that make up that animal’s face.

After a bisque firing in the kiln, the animal faces were ready to be glazed. Third graders really blew me away with their creativity and problem solving with this project. They came up with some really neat creatures!

IMG_20170210_082005

Horse / Mouse / Dog

IMG_20170210_082105

Bear / Unicorn / Lion

IMG_20170210_082136

Elephant / Pig

IMG_20170210_082221

White Tiger / Owl

IMG_20170210_082253

Cat / Cat / Cat (They are all so different!)

IMG_20170210_082320

Dolphin / Turtle / Jellyfish

IMG_20170210_082350

Pug / Pig / Pug

IMG_20170210_082453

Monster / Pig / Pig

IMG_20170214_075939

Giraffe / Dog

IMG_20170228_104552

Koala / Pug / Pig

IMG_20170228_104626

Mouse / Unicorn

IMG_20170301_081240

Cat / Deer

IMG_20170301_081313

Cat / Cat / Cat

IMG_20170301_081341

Cat / Cat / Cat

IMG_20170228_104644

Horse / Mad Cat

🙂 🙂 🙂


Leave a comment

Ceramic Goblets & Turtles

I did 2 different projects with 4th grade this year for their clay unit. Friday classes always fall behind schedule because of random breaks, teacher work days and all kinds of things. So with my Friday class I wanted to do a quick clay project so that their clay wouldn’t dry out in between all the times we will be able to see each other. We made neon clay turtles and they are amazing! Here is my sample:

img_20170306_073125

On the first day, 4th graders pinched out a pinch pot and created coils for the head and legs of their turtle. They also added details by building or carving. After going through the kiln, the turtles were ready to be painted with neon tempera paints. They are so psychedelic!

img_20170306_073041img_20170306_073018img_20170306_072955img_20170306_072930

The other 4th grade classes had a bit more time so we took a few weeks to create clay goblets. I really loved doing these with 4th grade because many of the remembered making coil pots in 3rd grade and pinch pots in k-2nd grade so they were able to use prior knowledge in their work.

On the first day, students made coils. They could lay their coils flat on top of each other like snakes or create spiral coils that are upright. I don’t have any pictures of this step because I was rollin’ coils like a madwoman! In order to get the correct circumference of their form, they wrapped their bottom flat coil around a small cup. When class was over, students placed their coil forms (finished or not) in a labeled Ziploc bag to be stored for next time.

On the second day, students carefully removed their coils from the bag. They got a new piece of clay and created a pinch pot. Then they “scratched and attached” their pinch pot to their coils to create a goblet. If there was enough time left, they could add handles or other details. Once they finished, they wrote their name and number on a slip of paper so I could carve it into the bottom.

img_20170207_133723

After a bisque firing in the kiln, students were able to glaze their pottery. I like to put one color on each table and have the kids carefully move around the room to use the colors of their choice.

img_20170214_130236

These turned out to be really beautiful. I think the students enjoyed creating someting functional 🙂

 


1 Comment

Clay Penguins & Clay Organization

These clay penguins were such a hit that I did them with k, 2, and art club! Kids in all grades were intrigued by these awesome little figurines.

img_20170210_073801

We started off by reading the book If You Were a Penguin. Students practiced drawing penguins in their sketchbooks using geometric shapes.

The next day, we build the penguins out of clay. Students were given a piece of clay and they had to give it a couple of gentle rolls in their hands to make a cylinder. Then, they used their thumb to gently create a hollow space inside.

img_20161215_090911

Next, they used extra clay to create a cone for the beak, spheres for the eyes, and smaller cylinders for the flippers. They carefully scratched and attached all of the pieces together.

img_20161215_093549

After a kiln firing, the penguins were painted using tempera paint with glitter. We talked about how the colors of a penguin help it camouflage from predators when it swims in the water.

Once the paint was dry, students got to take their little penguin pals home! With kindergartners, I kept the paint simple with just orange, black, and white. 2nd graders and art club kids have a wider range of motor skills and were able to add details like headphones, hats, and bows to their penguins so they got to use neon colors as well.

img_20170209_153035img_20170209_152642img_20170209_152603img_20170209_152524

These are so precious — every kid was engaged and excited about the project which made it awesome!!

I also want to talk about organization strategies for clay. Doing clay with 500+ kids can be really crazy logistically. It can be really difficult to stay organized and keep track of everything especially because projects are not flat. Finding the space for everything to dry properly can be a challenge. In the past, I did not have a kiln in my classroom which made it even more difficult because I had to cart everything to the other side of the school to be fired in the other art teacher’s classroom!

Now I am fortunate enough to have a glorious kiln room so I wanted to share how I stay organized with clay. First, when kids are finished working on their piece, they have to bring it to the back table and find a slip of paper withe their name on it. They then write their number next to their name. I use this to label all of the clay pieces – I carve the first letter of their name and their number. This makes it really easy to pass back work and it is a lot easier than carving the entire name.

The projects are separated by class and placed into copy paper box lids on a giant cart.

img_20170106_071302

I keep track of whats what by labeling the box with the teacher’s name, grade, and day that they come to art. I also make sure to hold on to the slips of paper until everything is passed out just in case there is a mix up with numbers or names (there inevitably always is with kindergarten).

Towards the top of the cart, I keep some glazes, a hot glue gun (for quick repairs), and paper bags to take the projects home in. I also have a few of my own pottery pieces that “exploded” in the kiln. These come in handy to show students whose projects may have met an unfortunate fate during the kiln firing. I always show them my own bowls and tell them that it even happens to grown up artists and sometimes you just have to have a good attitude and try again.

The rest of the glaze is in the kiln room organized like this:

img_20170106_070853

I got really lucky when I inherited this art classroom its it fully loaded with tons of supplies including a bunch of amazing Amaco glazes!!! They are organized by under glaze, gloss glaze, and crystal/textured glazes. On a teacher workday a few months ago, I made some test tiles for easy reference:

This was super helpful so that I could see which glazes were expired and which were still OK to use. When students glaze, I place one color on each table with a set of paintbrushes and the test tile for reference. It helps students to envision what the color will actually look like since often it is quite different than what the glaze looks like straight out of the bottle.

Recently someone asked me what my favorite thing to teach in art is. The answer has always been and will always be clay. There is something really special when it comes to working with the natural element of dirt. In a world that is moving increasingly towards digital media, it is important for artists – young and old – to maintain a connection to the earth.

And now I’m off to unload a glaze kiln full of animal faces — blog post about that coming soon!

❤ Ms. K

 


Leave a comment

Koi Fish Pond

This project — inspired by Art With Mrs. Nguyen — is a 10/10. The process was something fun and different for my art club students and the product is absolutely stunning.

img_20170123_090538

On the first day, we looked at Koi fish in traditional and contemporary Asian art. We also watched a relaxing video of koi fish swimming around in a pond. Students used a handout from Mrs. Nguyen’s TpT store to sketch koi in their sketchbook. They were also allowed to put their paper together with their friend’s to create a collaborative design. They were reminded to show depth by overlapping and make their composition more interesting by making some fish go off the page.

Next, each student was given a sheet of 12×18 inch water color paper. They copied their design onto the big paper and traced over their lines with oil pastels. Then, they used liquid water color and salt to paint. I set up a water color station on an extra table so students could get their own paint.

img_20170112_145246

img_20170112_151809img_20170112_151720img_20170112_150237img_20170112_150245

The painting took a couple of weeks because students were very meticulous about their color choices and sprinkling of salt to create a textured effect. In the end, these turned out to be absolutely beautiful.

img_20170123_084136img_20170123_084128img_20170123_084113img_20170123_084103img_20170123_084047img_20170123_084038img_20170123_083832img_20170123_083905img_20170123_083853img_20170123_083941img_20170123_083925img_20170123_084024

Awesome job art club!

 

 

 


1 Comment

Hot Dogs and Cool Cats

I am absolutely thrilled with how these warm and cool color pets went down in first grade. The kiddos were so excited about this project and both the process and product are super fun!

043

On the first day we talked about warm and cool colors and how to use shapes to draw a cat and dog. Students created a guide for the colors in their sketchbooks.

img_20160922_100347

Then they used This Handout from Teachers Pay Teachers to look at the different shapes that make a cat or dog. I really likes using these handouts as a guideline because it gave the kids a lot of choice and voice for how they wanted their animal to look.

img_20160922_100437

 

The next week, each student picked if they wanted to do a cat or a dog. They drew their animal BIG on a piece of paper and traced over the lines with sharpie. Then, they decided upon a warm or cool color scheme to paint with water colors.

014

The third week was used to put it all together. Students had to choose a piece of construction paper that is the opposite of their color scheme. They used crayons and texture mats to create texture in the background.

029.JPG

So I feel like every single art teacher in the world has a big ol’ book of wallpaper samples or patterned scrapbook paper tucked away somewhere in their classroom. And I really wanted these to have some more visual pop so we used those decades-old wall paper samples as a rug/bed for the cats and dogs. The kids absolutely loved being able to choose a patterned paper to cut into an oval. They cut out their animal and glued it down.

Hot diggity dog first graders! These cats and dogs are really cool!

❤ Ms. K


Leave a comment

Woven Animals

First graders studied animals in their PBL unit this spring and I thought a woven animal would be a great cross-curricular experience! This ended up being a kind of twist on the woven alligators I have done before but with more choice and voice. I was apprehensive about this at first because it is more open ended but just like kindergartener’s clay animals  I was pleasantly surprised and extremely impressed!

006.JPG

We began by creating painted paper using the primary colors and white. We talked about mixing secondary colors and tints. Students used the other end of the paintbrush to “draw” designs, lines, and shapes into their painting.

011.JPG

The next day, we created a weaving. Students had already been studying their animals in their home room classes and were able to answer the question: What color is your animal mostly? They picked out a piece of construction paper to represent their animal and created a loom to weave. They cut their painting into strips of paper to use as the weaving pieces.

001

On the third day, we talked about how animal’s body parts are made out of shapes. We talked about the different shapes of each animal and I demonstrated how to cut and glue other pieces of construction paper to add details, even pop-up details! I think first graders did an absolutely fantastic job with these, they have so much personality and the level of engagement, excitement, and motivation was so high because of the cross-curricular connection.

Whales with curly 3D water coming out of the blow holes:

Foxes:

004 (3).JPG

Koalas:

002 (4)

Komodo dragons:

Rabbits:

003 (4)

Sharks:

005 (3)

A tree frog:

009 (2)

A jaguar:

010 (2)

And my personal fave, pink flamingos:

I can’t even describe how proud I am of the kiddos for creating these, they are absolutely magnificent!


3 Comments

Clay Animals

I was so excited when the kindergarten team approached me to collaborate on a lesson. They were about to embark on a PBL unit all about animals and the product was going to be a diorama. So they asked me to make clay animals with the students. 🙂

006

Initially I was a bit apprehensive about the process. Kindergarteners have the least experience with fine motor skills when it comes to using clay and the project would require each student to have a different animal. There would be a lot of logistics going into the planning and management of teaching each student the skills to build a different animal. I was up for the challenge though because I am starting to step into the arena of more choice and voice type projects (the importance of which I have talked about here) and I knew that if I gave students the chance to explore the material they would be successful. This project ended up being incredibly authentic.

008

The kids had studied their animals for a couple of weeks prior to the start of this lesson. Their research included technology components and even drawing their animals which was great because they were prepared with knowledge about the body parts. So I began the demo showing them how to create a coil for the body by squeezing the clay into a hot dog.

005

I showed how to add legs, heads, wings, beaks, tails, fins, eyes, and all of the details they would need to build their animal. Each class had a different habitat they studied and students were in groups based on their animals. I printed off photographs of their animals as well as pictures of what that animal looks like out of clay so they could reference while they worked.

004

We kept the tools simple, each student got a chunk of clay, a burlap mat, and a mini popsicle stick. We also used slip or “clay glue” to stick the pieces together. It was amazing to see the kids working together and sharing ideas for how to create and build their animals. They were tremendously proud, engaged, and motivated to participate in this cross-curricular experience.

After getting bisque fired, students used tempera paints to paint their animals.

015

They came out better than I could have ever imagined – I am so proud of the hard work the students put into this project and so thankful that I got to be a part of it!

Arctic foxes:

029

Butterflies:

028

Parrots:

027

Clown fish:

019

A sea turtle and a shark:

021

Manatees:

022

Jaguars:

026

Snowy owls:

032

Penguins:

031

Orca whales:

030