Please Don't Eat the Artwork

ART WITH MS K


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Tiger Collages

When I saw @shakyhaakeart’s post with this project I knew it would be perfect for my 1st graders! We began by reading the charming story Mr. Tiger Goes Wild and doing a step-by-step tiger drawing. Students traced and colored their tigers with black crayons.

Teacher Sample & Story Book

On the second day, we used water colors to paint the tigers and the background. I showed students how to do a rainbow gradient but they could choose to paint their background however they wanted.

On the third day, the kids used construction paper to create grass, vines, leaves, and other jungle-y shapes and details.

Great job 1st graders!

❤ Mrs. K


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“Tattoo” Paper

I am so into this method of printmaking right now! I have seen it called marker printing but after a student pointed out that it was so similar to temporary tattoos we decided to rename it. 🙂

An art teacher friend Adrianna introduced this method to me a while back and I couldn’t wait to use it with my students.

You will need: white paper, an old transparency plastic page (any thick plastic will work), water base markers, a sponge, and water.

The first step is to color on the plastic film.

Next, you use a sponge to dampen the paper.

Then you flippity flop the transparency over so it is marker side down and you gently rub.

When you peel the plastic away, you are left with a stunning monoprint!

I did this technique with 2nd & 5th grade and used the papers to weave. 2nd graders created bird houses and 5th graders did simple weaving.

I love these so much and cannot wait to use this technique again! I think it would be beautiful as a background to a self-portrait or a background for a Styrofoam printed lesson.

❤ Mrs. K


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Easy-Peasy One Day Rainbows

Here is another easy-peasy one day project perfect for the end of the year. This one comes from @2Art.Chambers on Instagram.

I’m just gonna do a quick sidebar to say that I am LOVING how much art teachers share on Instagram & Twitter. When I first started teaching seven years ago (!!!) there were not too many resources other than old textbooks and Pinterest for us art teachers. Now I am inspired every single time I scroll through my feed and I am very grateful that folks share so much, it is always exciting to try a new, fresh project. Thanks Art Tachers! ❤

Examples Made by Me

We started by reading the story Ava and the Rainbow (Who Stayed) – which is just precious by the way – and talking about the colors in the rainbow. We used the traditional colors + magenta because it looks pretty 🙂

I played around with a few examples and ultimately decided to have the students paint the rainbows backwards simply because I have more purple paint than red paint so the red needed to be smaller. Sometimes ya gotta do what ya gotta do!

We painted these step-by-step starting with magenta and then moving on to red, orange, yellow, green, turquoise, indigo, and violet. When students completed their rainbows, they could add details in the middle.

This would be a great school-wide project to display but with less than a week of the school year remaining, these are going straight home. I really enjoy the tessellation-like effect of them all together though, they are giving me the same vibes as the collaborative quilt we did earlier this year!

❤ Mrs. K


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Friendly Crayons

I love love love love LOVE these fabulous painted paper crayons! When I saw them on Instagram @IArtMyJob there was a sound in my mind of a car screeching to a halt and I thought “STOP EVERYTHING, WE MUST MAKE THESE ASAP!” Luckily I was able to squeeze them in with a few classes just in time for the end of the school year!

Teacher Samples by Me

I ended up doing these with a few of my K, 2nd, & 3rd grade classes but these would work for any age or grade. With more time, we would also cover tints and shades and mixing colors. Hopefully next year I will get to do this a bit earlier.

We began by reading the book How the Crayons Saved the Rainbow which is a cute and simple story. I also had The Day the Crayons Quit and The Day the Crayons Came Home on deck (which in my opinion are better crayon stories) but for the sake of time we stuck with the short and sweet How the Crayons saved the Rainbow.

Students chose a color of tempera to paint their 6×9 paper. They could choose magenta, red, orange, yellow, green turquoise, blue, or violet. I gave each student a little swirl of paint on their paper and they used a paintbrush to spread it out evenly and then a fork to create texture.

With a little time left over at the end of class, we created a bar graph to show the color choices of the class. Turquoise and Magenta were definitely the most popular colors overall.

The next class, students used a matching piece of construction paper to create the crayon tip and the arms and legs. They cut black paper to create the classic Crayola wavy line wrapper. Students also used white paper and a black crayon to make eyes and a mouth.

These were a huge hit, all of the other grades and classes were begging to make them! It would be fun to have every kids in the school make one and hang them all up together next year 🙂

❤ Mrs. K


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Beehive Prints

Variations of this project have been floating around Pinterest/Instagram/Twitter for a while but I originally saw it on @MarshallElementaryArt on Instagram 🙂

3rd graders began by creating a bubble wrap print on yellow paper. They used magenta, turquoise, and yellow paint and mixed the colors to create a rainbow effect.

The next day, we watched the BrainPop about bees and talked all about these wonderful insects. Each student used a hexagon template to trace and cut their yellow paper. Students then practiced drawing bees in a step-by-step drawing lesson based on this:

They referred to their sketch to create 2 or 3 bees which they traced with sharpie and colored with Crayola Art Sticks. I love Art Sticks because they produce the same beautiful effect as colored pencils but without the fuss of sharpening!

The last two days were spent assembling everything together. Students used old plastic sleeves for the bees wings. They carefully cut and glued their bee bodies to the plastic wings and then glued each bee to their hexagon. This was a very labor-intensive process but the artwork turned out BEE-utiful! (The kids were absolutely sick of all of my bee puns after this project hehehe!)

With only a couple weeks left in the school year, these got sent straight home. Next year I hope to do this project a bit earlier so that they can BEE displayed in the school for all to enjoy 🙂

❤ Mrs. K


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Pop Art Onomatopoeia Prints

The idea for this project comes from my friend Katie over @SweetAppleESArt. I knew this would be a great cross-curricular lesson for my 5th graders as soon as I saw her fabulous examples on Twitter 🙂

These got TONS of compliments hanging in the hallway outside of the cafeteria!

On the first day, students used bubble wrap to create a print. They mixed yellow, turquoise, and magenta tempera paint to create a spectrum of lovely colors. We also watched the BrainPop video about Pop Art so students could be inspired by some of the great artists of the movement. We had a little chat about how artists of the time were responding to current events and society to make a new and exciting type of art.

The next day, students brainstormed an onomatopoeia of their choice. 5th graders learn about onomatopoeia so this was a great language arts connection!

They could pick one from a word bank or use one that they already knew. They sketched their word on sketch paper and drew it in bubble letters. Students were encouraged to illustrate their word further. For example, if the word was “oink” they could add pig details. The kids were SO creative with this and really used their imaginations to make some cool designs!

The kids drew their word onto a piece of colorful construction paper and traced their lines with sharpie. They cut and mounted the word onto another piece which was then cut and mounted again. Each paper was cut with a zig-zag or scalloped line to create a cool pop art effect.

Great job 5th grade!

❤ Mrs. K


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Donuts in a Day

This one day lesson was perfect for a filler project at the end of the school year. I love teaching step-by-step drawing lessons because students feel more empowered when they can be successful. Going step-by-step is a great way to make sure everyone is flowing through the drawing process smoothly.

We began by following this guide for drawing a donut:

Students traced over their lines with Sharpie and then colored the sprinkles with Crayola Twistables. Then, they painted over their design with watercolor paint.

This project was great for 2nd-5th graders. I love how unique each one is, just like my amazing students!

❤ Mrs. K


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Pattern Hearts

This was a fun one day project that all ages enjoyed. We started off by tracing 3 hearts onto a piece of 6×9 paper. The hearts were made using the die-cut machine with poster board.

Students filled each heart with patterns and traced over their lines with sharpie. Then, they used watercolors to paint their designs.

This easy-peasy one day lesson was perfect for the end of the school year.

❤ Mrs. K


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Warm & Cool Abstract Name Designs

I have a seen a bunch of versions of this on Instagram and Pinterest lately with all different variations in materials and style. I wanted to try it out with my 4th graders in between our clay unit and our stitching unit as a easy drawing and painting project. It was a huge hit!

Teacher Samples by Me 🙂

The first day, we began by measuring the paper into sections and creating horizontal lines. Then students wrote their names in a way that filled up the space and traced over the lines with sharpie.

On the second day, we reviewed warm and cool colors. Students used Crayola Twistables to color in some of their shapes with either warm or cool colors. On the third day, they painted the remaining empty shapes with the opposite color scheme.

Nice work 4th graders!

❤ Mrs. K


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Pop Up Houses

These fantastic little pop-up houses were inspired by makeandtakes.com We followed their tutorial but due to time only did one story instead of 2 for our houses.

Teacher Sample by MK

On the first day, students measured and cut to make the paper pop-up for the house. They draw a triangle or a trapezoid onto a separate piece of construction paper for the roof as well as a rectangle for the door.

On the second day, students designed the background, house, and yard with fluorescent oil pastels. We read the story “Home” and students were inspired by the different textures and details from the homes in the book. They were encouraged to think about the yard with a bird’s eye view (what would it look like if a bird was flying over and looking down at the house?) We added a path, plants, windows, trees, and a sky.

On the third day, students painted over their designs with tempera cakes. They were encouraged to use colors that contrast to really make their artwork pop.

Great job 3rd graders!

❤ Mrs. K