Please Don't Eat the Artwork

ART WITH MS K


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Illuminated Manuscript Inspired Letters

5th graders learned all about Illuminated Manuscripts   for this project. They were fascinated by the process of creating vellum paper from animal skins and adding real gold onto the pages of books to make them ‘illuminate.’ We began by sketching a design that featured the first letter of their first or last name. Students were encouraged to add a decorative border and personal symbolism or designs that would add visual interest to their letter.

Next, students copied their design onto a piece of painting paper. They traced over their lines with permanent markers and colored in some areas with crayons.

They painted the negative space around their letter with metallic tempera paint. They could choose from gold, silver, or copper. They filled in the rest with watercolors.

I am so impressed with how beautiful these turned out. The kids really put a lot of time and though into them and the personalization and symbolism made for an overall very engaging project.

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Vibrant Villages

This Cassie Stephens inspired project  was a huge hit with 4th graders! We began by sketching houses. We talked about variety, geometric shapes, repetition, and contrast.

For their final draft, students chose 10-15 houses to draw onto painting paper. They traced over their lines with black crayon and colored in the houses with Crayola Twistables. Next, we used magenta, yellow, and turquoise liquid watercolors. Painting over the houses colored with crayons created a resist effect.

The colors mixed together to make a beautiful tie-dye rainbow. Kids got to sprinkle salt too which created a lovely texture.


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A Rainbow of My Own

As we are gearing up to put work together for our Artome art show, I realized that i completely forgot to post about first grade’s rainy day portraits. These were inspired by this blog post from Grade Onderful. I thought these would be absolutely charming for the art show and a great project to get students back into good drawing, cutting, and painting habits.

We began by drawing a rainy day landscape with white oil pastels. Students drew a horizontal line in the middle of their paper and created spirals on the bottom half and diagonal lines on the top half. Then, they painted over their lines with black, purple, and blue watercolors. They were amazed at the “magic” resist technique!

While they were painting, I called them up one by one to take their picture holding an umbrella. My assistant principal was so helpful to print all of the color photos for me — thanks Kerri-Ann!

The next week, students cut out their “selves” and glued it to their rainy background. Then, they drew and colored a rainbow which was cut out and placed above the horizon line. I think these will look terrific in the Artome frames for the art show!

The art show is Monday, December 4th from 4:30-6:30. Artwork is $25 cash or check and we will be offering reproductions as well as originals this year. Hope to see you there!

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❤ Mrs. K


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Crystals

Art Club just completed their crystal paintings and they are amaaaaaazing! This project was based on one from The Lost Sock Blog Students began by sketching crystal designs. Each table had a folder with tons of different crystal clusters and how-to-draws. Some of the kids caught on to drawing crystals really quickly and some struggled with ti quite a bit. I think it was difficult for some students to get the angles of the lines right to make the crystals look like they had form. For the struggling students I ended up making a design that they could trace BUT they had to change something about it to make it creative. This ended up being really helpful and in the end I think all of the students were pretty happy with their designs and pleased with their overall work.

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My Example

After sketching, students drew their design onto painting paper ad traced over their lines with Crayola Twistables.

Next, they used water colors to paint inside of their gems.

The last step was to paint the background with black liquid water colors and sprinkle salt for texture. I love how these turned out, they are all so unique and creative!

Great job art club!

❤ Mrs. K


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The Day the Crayons Quit

Yesterday was Halloween. Everybody dressed up in a costume and there was a parade around the school. Technically the parade was for “Book Character Day” not Halloween but it is no coincidence that they are on the same day.

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Your Favorite Slytherin Professor

With excitement flowing through the students like electricity I knew that working on our regular academic projects would be a challenge. I wanted to do something based on a book to go along with the theme of the day. Something easy and fun and silly. So, we read one of my most favorite stories The Day the Crayons Quit and the sequel, The Day the Crayons Came Home

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Students used sharpies and crayons to decorate a popsicle stick. They created a face for their character and even added pipe cleaners (which I hot glued) to give their crayon a pose.

This was the PREFECT one day project for Book Character Day/Halloween!

❤ Mrs. K


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Art Club Neon Tigers

When I saw the amazing neon tigers created by the blog smART Class I couldn’t wait to try them out with my art club kiddos! First of all, this project gave me some serious nostalgia because it reminded me a lot of Lisa Frank which I loved when I was younger. I think I had almost every single sticker and folder that she ever created – especially the super sparkly ones. Even as I am writing this blog post I am wondering how I can incorporate Lisa Frank into my adult life. Shoes? A dress? A lunchbox? ALL OF THE THINGS?! In the meantime I will have to just be satisfied with neon tiger paintings. Here is my example:

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We started off this project with step-by-step drawing. I played the video from the blog post and we drew along.

If students needed to slow down or pause, they did wavy arms. The entire classroom looked like this:

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Students were encouraged to add more details to fill up the space of they drew their tiger small. The next week, they used black paint or sharpie to bold their sketch lines.

The last step was to use fluorescent Versa Temp paint to add color. I LOVE these awesome paintings, they are so full of character and really showcase the creativity of art club kids.

Great work art club!

❤ Mrs. K


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Kinder Pumpkins

Kindergartners are just finishing up their pumpkin paintings so I figured I would share a few in time for Halloween. We began by reading The Legend of Spookley the Square Pumpkin which is a adorable rhyming story with gorgeous illustrations. Then, we drew pumpkins using an oval and curved lines on big white paper.

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Students painted their pumpkins by mixing red and yellow paint. The next week, we created texture on purple paper by rubbing crayons with a texture mat. Then students cut out their pumpkins and glued them. They chose a piece of green paper and drew a leaf which got cut out and glued to the stem of the pumpkin. With scrap papers they rolled little lines into a cylinder and unrolled it to make a curly spiral vine. I do not have any pictures of the process but here are some great examples of the final product:

I love these precious pumpkins!

❤ Mrs. K

 


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Pumpkins Inspired by Yayoi Kusama

Ever since I found out that the artwork of Yayoi Kusama will be displayed at the High Museum in 2018  I have been HYPED. There is so much to love about this artist – from the fact that she is a woman to the fact that she has been creating artwork (paintings, sculptures, installations – you name it!) for several decades, any way you look at it Yayoi Kusama is impressive. I love her bold graphic style and now, so did my second graders! We began by looking at some of her artwork and noticing that she often creates sculptures of pumpkins that have polka dots.

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We bean our own version by drawing a pumpkin on construction paper. Students could choose any color they wanted because Kusama’s pumpkins are often multi-colored or other colors besides orange. I showed students how to draw a pumpkin by making an oval in the middle with curved lines on the sides.

 

After drawing, students used white paint to go over their lines. Then, they dipped a marker cap and stamped to make polka dots.

A colorful pumpkin patch:

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The next week, student carefully cut out their pumpkins and glued them to another piece of construction paper. Then, they drew geometric shapes (triangles) in the background and traced over the lines with markers.

This was such a fun project and a really great twist on making pumpkins. Way to go 2nd graders!

❤ Mrs. K


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Cool and Warm Stamped Hearts

Third graders just finished up their cool and warm stamped artwork. We began this project by talking about the warm and cool colors. Students used watercolor paint and tempera to create a colorful background. They sprinkled salt on their wet paint for texture.

The next week, we talked about the artwork of Peter Max and Keith Haring we compared and contrasted their artwork and had a great class discussion talking about all of the elements and principles of art that are present in each artist’s work. Students were especially inspired by emphasis and symmetry to create their prints. They used a variety of materials to stamp on top of their paintings.

We talked a lot about symmetry for this one and I showed students how to create symmetry by stamping a shape on one side and then doing it again on the other side. We also talked a lot about balance and emphasis. I absolutely love how these prints turned out, they are so much fun!

Great job 3rd graders!

Mrs. K


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Autumn Trees by Kindergarten

Kindergarteners began this lesson with the story “Sky Color.”

Sky-Color

This story is super cute, it is all about a young artist who discovers that the sky doesn’t always have to be painted blue. I always find that my blue paint/crayons/markers/ANYTHING is the first to run out because it is the most popular color for filling up a sky. I wanted my students to know that the sky can be many different colors so this book was perfect to lead us into the project. Each student got a white oil pastel and filled their paper with  clouds. Then, they used water colors to paint “sky colors” which made their clouds magically appear!

The next week, we watched the BrainPop about Fall. We talked about all of the changes that happen when Fall comes especially the beautiful leaves. We reviewed color mixing too. Students drew a tree on top of their sky color background with a brown oil pastel.

They start off with a vertical line and then make it thicker. Next, they draw two diagonal lines to make the letter Y. They draw another vertical line in between and make all of those thicker. The little branches are created by creating little Y’s.

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Now the original idea for this project comes from here and they used aluminum foil to create the leaves. With my first batch of kinders I also had them use aluminum foil and that was the only time we did it that way because they did not turn out great. Most of the foil trees just looked like a big ol’ blob of paint on the paper and the detail of the branches was lost. So I racked my brain – and my supply closet – for something else we could use to print leaves. I found a stash of pine cones and they turned out to be absolutely PERFECT for this! So all the other classes used pine cones to dip and stamp yellow and red paint.

These are just absolutely charming:

Great job kindergarteners!

Mrs. K