Please Don't Eat the Artwork

ART WITH MS K


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Earth Weaving

3rd graders are finishing up their earth weavings. This project was inspired by @Mizzlee_art on Instagram.

We started by tracing a circle and painting the earth. Students used blue and green tempera cakes to paint the oceans and continents. They also painted a rainbow onto a separate piece of paper.

The next week, students cut out their earth circles and folded them in half. They used a ruler to make a mark every 2 inches. I went around and made the lines longer.

The unfolded paper creates a loom in which the rainbow lines can be woven. Students carefully made their lines go over-under-over-under to create a beautiful earth with a rainbow.

With a few minutes left at the end of class, students used their own bodies to weave! Some kids held strings while others went over-under-over-under.

This was a fun way to reinforce learning and get some wiggles out!

❤ Mrs. Katzin


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Rocket Ship Sculptures

Kindergarten kiddos are wrapping up their rocket ship sculptures. They were super fun to make!

I found a tutorial video and handy printout on Krokotak.com This website has AWESOME resources!

We read the book Tiny Little Rocket and talked all about outer space. Then, each student received a black piece of construction paper and metallic colored pencils. Students created a shiny starry galaxy background.

I had copied the handout onto several colors of bright, neon card stock. Each student got a piece and used colored pencils to add little patterns and designs in each shape.

The next art class, we cut, glued, and assembled the rockets. Students were so excited to make them pop up by carefully folding or bending the paper. But the ultimate best part of this project was that students got to trade pieces with their classmates. This allowed them to create a rocket with a variety of colors. They loved this collaborative aspect!

Way to go kindergartners!

❤ Mrs. K


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The Day You Begin

Grade 2 did a fab job withe these little portrait paintings!

On the first day, I read the book The Day You Begin. I got this story from the book fair earlier this year because the illustrations are gorgeous and the story is wonderful. It is about how everyone is different and when we listen to each other we can understand one another and even make a new friend! I knew right away that I wanted to create an art lesson to go with this book.

This illustration was the particular inspiration for this project:

After reading the story and discussing the ways in which each of us are different, I took a pic of each student holding a big book.

The next week, students cut and glued their picture to a piece of paper and used fluorescent oil pastels to create flowing lines of movement coming out of the book. Then, they used tempera cakes to paint right over the oil pastels. This made the artwork so vibrant!

These little portraits are so sweet, they are going to look wonderful displayed in the hallway!

❤ Mrs. K


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Fluorescent Cacti with Pom-Poms

This fun and fabulous project was inspired by @art_with_mia. This step-by-step project was pretty simple but it has a big wow factor.

We started off with a step-by-step drawing on 12×18 paper. Students drew the cactus shapes and added a horizon line and a sun or moon. They were careful to only draw a few detail lines so the next step would be easier.

After drawing with pencil, students traced over their lines with black tempera paint. They used their paintbrush to add spikes and prickles. The next week, students used fluorescent tempera paint to bring their compositions to life. After painting they glued on soft pom-poms. This lead to a great conversation about texture and contrast.

❤ Mrs. K


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Ceramic Cups

Spring Art Club kicked off with ceramic cups. This project was super fun and engaging. Students started off with a slab of clay. I am so grateful for my North Star Table Top Slab Roller which I purchased with SPLOST funds last year. It makes rolling slabs a breeze! I rolled the slabs in the morning so they had some time to firm up before afternoon art club.

When the kids arrived, they wrapped a plastic grocery bag around a standard sized can. Wrapping the can keeps the wet clay from sticking. They carefully wrapped their slab around the bagged can and scratch-&_attached a slab bottom.

Next it was time to decorate the cups. The kids used coils, slabs, and pinching methods to design a creative, one-of-a-kind ceramic cup.

Usually I would let a large and dense clay project like this dry out for at least a week but we were kind of in a time crunch. Luckily, there was a nice sunny day the next day and I set the cups outside to dry. (pictured below with some second grade sundials)

I fired them veeeerrrrry slowly in the kiln and luckily there were no explosions. The kids were so excited to paint the next week!

These turned out super fantastic, they will be perfect for holding pens & pencils or other trinkets!

❤ Mrs. K


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Ceramic Flowers

First graders had a blast sculpting these ceramic flowers! We began with a chunk of clay that was rolled into a sphere. Students used their shoe to press it flat and create texture. This experience was quite the hit with the kiddos!

Next, students pinched and molded extra clay pieces to create petals and a center for their flower. They used tools to add more texture and designs.

The flowers went into the kiln to be bisqued and when they came out, it was time to paint. Students could choose shimmer colors or neon colors to paint their flowers.

Great job, first graders!


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Sculptural Self-Portraits

The idea for this project comes from @Show_me_the_monet  and Krokotak.com. When I saw these funky self-portrait sculptures I knew they would be perfect for my 2nd graders 🙂

Teacher Samples
(Made by MK)

The project required a ton of prep work on my part – I cut several different shades of “skin tone” construction paper into pieces for the face, nose, and ears. Yellow, black, and brown pieces had to be cut into manageable sizes to be used for hair. A variety of colors had to be cut up for the shirts and backgrounds. Small pieces of white paper were cut for the eyes, mouth, and details. So it was a lot of quality time spent with my handy paper cutter but it was WORTH IT!

On the first day of the project, we practiced creating 2D self-portraits in our sketch folders. I love teaching self-portraits, it is so much fun to show the students all the different ways of how to draw details of the face. Drawing is hard for young kids but it is such a great skill to learn so I encourage my students to keep a positive attitude and try their best (as usual 🙂 )

The next week, we read the book The Colors of Us which is all about diversity and how we are all different colors and all of those colors are beautiful. Students then choose a color for their background and shirt. Then they pick a neutral color that best matches their skin color. They use a big piece and make it into a rainbow for the face. They roll a small piece for the nose. It can be a circle or a tear-drop shape. We also have time to create the ears on the first day and that is pretty much it.

The next week, I show students how to make hair. I show them several different techniques of cutting, bending, folding, and gluing the paper. They get a paper that matches their hair color and create their hair style.

After creating the hair, students use crayons on a white paper to create their eyes and mouth (just like how we did in the sketch on the first day.) Then they assemble everything and add details like designs on the shirt, a background, and any accessories that they like.

It was so hard to choose just a few for this blog post because they were all so fabulous! One teacher commented that if her children had brought home this project when they were kids, she would have put it in a shadow box and kept it forever. That made my heart glow! I hope my student’s parents love them too. This will be a classic project that I will definitely be doing year after year 🙂

❤ Mrs. K


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Mixed Media Solar Systems

Fourth graders did a fantastic job with these mixed media solar systems! We started this project as while they learned about planets, stars, and solar systems in science class so there were some great cross-curricular connections.

We began by looking at Starry Night and noticing the lines of movement in the night sky.

Students used liquid glue to create lines inspired by starry night on black paper. They sprinkled multi-colored glue onto the glue and placed the paper onto the drying rack. We used multi-colored glitter to represent stars that are hot and cooler, closer and far away.

The next week, we created a beautiful mono-print with ziploc bags, markers, and spray bottles. First, students colored on the bags with Mr. Sketch water based markers.

Next, they sprayed the bags a couple of times with water.

Then, they gently pressed a white paper onto the wet bag.

When the paper is carefully peeled off, it reveals a beautiful tie-dye watercolor paper. It was such a fun way to create a painting!

The next week, we read Tiny Little Rocket and had a chat about form and planetary rotation. Planets are 3D and we can make out planets look like they have form by shading. The part closer to the sun is not shaded and the part further away has a dark crescent. Students used cups to trace circles onto their painted paper and a black colored pencil to create a shaded crescent.

The next art class, students carefully cut and glued their planets onto their starry night background. They had to make sure their shaded sides were all going in the same direction and could also use scrap paper to make some planets pop up. They could also overlap planets and make some going off of the page.

This turned out to be a super fun project, the process and the product are equally successful and engaging. I love when students are able to make connections in the art room and bring their learning into other aspects of their lives 🙂

❤ Mrs. K


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Snowy Landscapes

The idea for this lesson comes from @artwithmrsnguyen

Teacher Sample

The first week of this project, we practiced mixing tints and shades. We used this worksheet.  Students could choose green, purple, magenta, turquoise, or blue for their artwork. I have found that these colors create the most aesthetically pleasing tints and shades. Red, yellow, and orange tend to get a bit dull or sometimes gross/scary looking.

The next week, students created tints and shades on a square piece of paper. They started with white in the middle to be the moon and then mixed colors going in circular brush strokes outward.

The next week, we added the details step-by-step.

I think these paintings are just so enchanting!

❤ Mrs. K


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Paper Snow Globes

These little paper snow globes are the perfect one-day project right before winter break! The inspiration form this comes from Pinterest 🙂

We read the book Snowmen at Night. Students were inspired to create different scarves and hats for their snowman and they also noticed how shading a circle made it have form.

We created the designs step-by-step:

The kids did a fab job with these, almost everyone was successful and ended up with something they were super proud of. I don’t usually do such “crafty” projects but every once in a while (especially the week before winter break) it can be fun!

Happy Holidays!

❤ Mrs. K