Please Don't Eat the Artwork

ART WITH MS K


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“Tattoo” Paper

I am so into this method of printmaking right now! I have seen it called marker printing but after a student pointed out that it was so similar to temporary tattoos we decided to rename it. ūüôā

An art teacher friend Adrianna introduced this method to me a while back and I couldn’t wait to use it with my students.

You will need: white paper, an old transparency plastic page (any thick plastic will work), water base markers, a sponge, and water.

The first step is to color on the plastic film.

Next, you use a sponge to dampen the paper.

Then you flippity flop the transparency over so it is marker side down and you gently rub.

When you peel the plastic away, you are left with a stunning monoprint!

I did this technique with 2nd & 5th grade and used the papers to weave. 2nd graders created bird houses and 5th graders did simple weaving.

I love these so much and cannot wait to use this technique again! I think it would be beautiful as a background to a self-portrait or a background for a Styrofoam printed lesson.

‚̧ Mrs. K


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Friendly Crayons

I love love love love LOVE these fabulous painted paper crayons! When I saw them on Instagram @IArtMyJob there was a sound in my mind of a car screeching to a halt and I thought “STOP EVERYTHING, WE MUST MAKE THESE ASAP!” Luckily I was able to squeeze them in with a few classes just in time for the end of the school year!

Teacher Samples by Me

I ended up doing these with a few of my K, 2nd, & 3rd grade classes but these would work for any age or grade. With more time, we would also cover tints and shades and mixing colors. Hopefully next year I will get to do this a bit earlier.

We began by reading the book How the Crayons Saved the Rainbow which is a cute and simple story. I also had The Day the Crayons Quit and The Day the Crayons Came Home on deck (which in my opinion are better crayon stories) but for the sake of time we stuck with the short and sweet How the Crayons saved the Rainbow.

Students chose a color of tempera to paint their 6×9 paper. They could choose magenta, red, orange, yellow, green turquoise, blue, or violet. I gave each student a little swirl of paint on their paper and they used a paintbrush to spread it out evenly and then a fork to create texture.

With a little time left over at the end of class, we created a bar graph to show the color choices of the class. Turquoise and Magenta were definitely the most popular colors overall.

The next class, students used a matching piece of construction paper to create the crayon tip and the arms and legs. They cut black paper to create the classic Crayola wavy line wrapper. Students also used white paper and a black crayon to make eyes and a mouth.

These were a huge hit, all of the other grades and classes were begging to make them! It would be fun to have every kids in the school make one and hang them all up together next year ūüôā

‚̧ Mrs. K


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Rocket Ship Sculptures

Kindergarten kiddos are wrapping up their rocket ship sculptures. They were super fun to make!

I found a tutorial video and handy printout on Krokotak.com This website has AWESOME resources!

We read the book Tiny Little Rocket and talked all about outer space. Then, each student received a black piece of construction paper and metallic colored pencils. Students created a shiny starry galaxy background.

I had copied the handout onto several colors of bright, neon card stock. Each student got a piece and used colored pencils to add little patterns and designs in each shape.

The next art class, we cut, glued, and assembled the rockets. Students were so excited to make them pop up by carefully folding or bending the paper. But the ultimate best part of this project was that students got to trade pieces with their classmates. This allowed them to create a rocket with a variety of colors. They loved this collaborative aspect!

Way to go kindergartners!

‚̧ Mrs. K


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Art to Remember Fundraiser

I am so excited to share this year’s art fundraiser with you. From start to finish the experience was exceptional – it was easy, fun, and well worth the time in the funds  – and excitement – produced. 

Keychain

The past couple of years I have done a framed art show. The effect of 700+ works of art in the gym together is really astounding. That is one aspect of that fundraiser I will miss. The parts I will not miss are the time spent dealing with all of the artwork – gluing each piece to a special paper, filling out all of the little name cards, making sure everything is facing the right way, handling all of the frames, waiting for the show to be taken down (I was at school til’ 9 pm – yikes!), and making barely any money as a profit. So this year I decided to switch from frames to chachkis and boy am I glad I did! Not only did I make TEN TIMES MORE PROFIT than I did with the framed show, I also did not have to handle any money, stay late into the evening, or organize a crowded event. This fundraiser was a dream!

Matted Print

I reached out to several different companies that do this sort of thing and ultimately decided to go with https://arttoremember.com/ Communicating with my representative was easy and everything came with easy-to-follow instructions in a neat little box. They even sent over a ton of sample products which helped me get the kids hyped up. 

Travel Mug

The paper we used was 8×10. It was the perfect size for a beginning of the year project. Here are the projects I did with each grade:

K Rainbow Lines: https://artwithmsk.com/2017/09/17/rainbow-lines-that-wiggle-mouse-shapes/
1st Rainy Day Portrait: https://artwithmsk.com/2017/11/06/a-rainbow-of-my-own/
2nd Whimsical Landscape: https://artwithmsk.com/2017/10/01/moana-landscapes-by-2nd-grade/
3rd Georgia O’keeffe Flower: https://artwithmsk.com/2016/09/26/flowers-and-portraits/
4th Vibrant Village: https://artwithmsk.com/2017/11/13/vibrant-villages/
5th Succulent Still Life: https://artwithmsk.com/2016/10/03/psychedelic-succulent-still-life-paintings/

Night Light

I liked the paper because there was no border or name card or anything else that the kids had to do other than create their artwork. Art to Remember sent me sticker bar codes with each child’s name which I adhered to the back of the artwork. Easy peasy!

Journal & Bookmarks 

The art was then shipped off and in return, each student received a custom order form with their specific artwork pictured and instructions of how to order online. They had about 2 weeks to place and order and then about a month later the products arrived. 

And lemme tell ya about the products!! The stuff is SO COOL! There are water bottles, mugs, magnets, phone cases, mouse pads (“What’s a mouse pad Ms. Katzin?”), key chains, pillows, cutting boards, night lights, and a million other cool things. The majority of the items are very high quality. The price point is a tad more expensive than what you would find at Target but the premium of having custom artwork is WORTH IT! So many kids told me that they will be giving their items as holiday gifts which is absolutely precious. The artwork looks absolutely STUNNING – it is vibrant, rich in color, and true to the original. 

Water Bottle

It took about 3 hours to sort and organize the products when they arrived. I made sure to thoroughly check each child’s order and make sure all of the items were included and correct. All of the small items were grouped together by teacher and there is an order confirmation number on each item which is individually wrapped. This made passing out the stuff so simple!

Ruler

Overall I am so happy with the process and products of Art to Remember. I have gotten a lot of positive feedback from the kids and community and am looking forward to another great fundraiser next year. 

If you are thinking about doing an art fundraiser please consider working with Art to Remember. I cannot rave enough about how wonderful this was for my school and community (and sanity!) I give it a solid 100 and know that you will love it too! 

‚̧ Mrs. K 


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Kawaii Rainbow Clouds

Kawaii means “cute” in Japanese and IMO there is really no other way to describe these little rainbow clouds! This project was inspired by a post from @oliver_artroom on Instagram. I did this with a few of my kindergarten classes and one 1st grade class. I had kids from other grades (even 4th & 5th!)¬†beg¬†to make one but we simply did not have time.

We began by painting a paper with rainbow stripes on the front and back. This was¬†very¬†revolutionary to the kids and they kept asking me “are you¬†sure¬†we are supposed to paint the back too!?” Yeah guys, I am sure : )

Next class, we read¬†Little Cloud¬†and created a cloud on card stock. Students cut their rainbow paper into strips and clued it to the cloud. We added googly eyes (or hand-drawn eyes) and a smile. Kids punched a hole in the top and tied on a piece of yarn to hang their little rainbow cloud. Aren’t the the cutest EVER?! I wanted to keep them all and hang them from the art room ceiling but I am sure that would have caused quite the uproar so I hope they are happily hanging on bedroom walls or refrigerator doors (or if it had been my parents, in the garage which was a kid’s art gallery). Enjoy!

‚̧ Mrs. K

 

 


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Activities for the Last Day of Art Class

It can be a challenge to plan the last few weeks of art lessons. You want to do something that is engaging and educational but fun. It is the end of the year after all! This year I did a bunch of different one or two day lessons and then on the very last day of art I had students do Genius Hour or The Day the Crayons Quit. I wanted to create a blog post about these and some of my other favorite last day lessons.

Water Graffiti
I have talked about this one before. At my old school, I had an enormous and mostly empty courtyard outside of my classroom. It was perfect for doing Water Graffiti. Basically, we would take big cups of water and paint brushes outside and paint with water. This was not only exceptionally fun but also provided a nice little science lesson about evaporation and the water cycle.

I would give challenges of who could paint the biggest ____ or who could work together to create a ______, who could write the entire alphabet without it evaporating. I haven’t done this in a few years but it is super fun on the last day, especially if it is nice out!

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The Dot
This activity is perfect if the weather isn’t great or if you have a group that you just don’t¬† trust to paint outside with water. I read¬†The Dot¬†to the class and put big pieces of butcher paper on each table. Students use a variety of art supplies to create their own dots. Usually there is an episode of Magic School Bus playing too ūüôā

The Day the Crayons Quit
I will never tire of reading The Day the Crayons Quit to students. It is hilarious and so is the sequel. We begin by reading one or both and then do a step-by-step to create the crayon craft. This project is definitely more on the crafty side which I often try to avoid but it is so cute that I deem it OK for the last day of art class. I did this project earlier this year with the classes I had on Halloween because it was also Book Character Day. It is a perfect one day lesson for an exciting school day!

Each kiddo gets a popsicle stick and we create the crayon details, the name of the crayon color, and the face with sharpie. Then, they color it in. Next, students pick a pipe cleaner that most matches their crayon’s color and they cut it in half. I hot clue the pipe cleaners to the back to create pose-able arms and legs.

Genius Hour
“Ms. Katzin, why is it called genius hour if specials is only 45 minutes?” one sassy yet observant student asks. The answer is because this is an idea I borrowed from the kindergarten team. Out at carpool I started noticing kindergartners with amazing creations that they were designing and building during Genius Hour – an hour devoted to creativity. I am absolutely over the moon about this process and wish I had thought of doing it earlier in the year.

Basically – Genius Hour is where you can make whatever you want out of the materials provided. The creative ideas the kids come up with is astonishing. Here are the materials they could use: Pipe cleaners, scrapbook paper, scrap paper, felt, string, beads, paper cups, straws, receipt paper, mat board, scissors, staples, tape, glue. I explained the supplies to them and went over some basic rules and procedures and then they got to work.

One very cool and popular item was the Corru-Gator which crimps the paper. I only had one so the kids had to bring their paper to me but I plan on ordering a bunch more for next year.

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Check out these amazing creations!

I ended up placing a few more items out like bulletin board boarders and painted paper scraps as things got depleted. I am already starting to collect random knick-knacks to put in the Genius Hour bin for next year. I am hoping to do this more frequently than just the last day of art class.

Hope everyone has a great summer! See you in the fall!

‚̧ Mrs. Katzin

 


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Prickly Pear Cactus Collages

Kinders loved making these prickly pear cactus collages! This project included a variety of art techniques and a ton of vocabulary. It is definitely one I will be revisiting next year!

We began by reading¬†Mix it Up¬†which is a really fun interactive color mixing book. I usually put it up on the¬†Document Camera¬†and call kids up to “mix” the colors. They are absolutely blown away by the “magic” book – it is super fun! After reviewing color mixing, students create a green paper by mixing blue and yellow. They use a fork to create prickly or spiky texture.

The next class, we talk about desert landscapes. A horizontal line is drawn across the paper. Above the line, kids use white oil pastels to make clouds. Below the line, they use a texture mat to create textured sand. They paint the sky blue and the ground brownish-gold.

The next week, students use cups to trace circles onto their green paper. They cut out the circles and glue them to the desert background with the biggest at the bottom ad the smallest at the top – just like a prickly pear cactus.

The last day of the project begins with the adorable story Hug Me. Then, students use cardboard to stamp spikes and cotton swabs to stamp flowers.

One of my kindergarten class was a little behind so we used black paper for a night time landscape. The other classes created the sunny daytime desert. I think both look great!

‚̧ Mrs. K


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Alphabet Soup

This project is based on the one created by @2art.chambers for the Mini Matisse Blog.

Kindergartners practiced their alphabet for this scrumptious project. We began by reading¬†Alpha Oops. ¬†Students traced a pie pan circle onto white paper and used oil pastel to draw their letters. Using a mixture of brown, yellow, and gold liquid water color, they painted their “soup”.

Next, the kiddos picked out a piece of construction paper and used crayons to create patterns. They cut and glued their circle along with a plastic spoon (that was spray-painted silver).

Great job kindergartners!

‚̧ Mrs. K

 

p.s. Why couldn’t the pirate learn the alphabet?

. . . . .

. . . .

. . .

. .

He was always lost at C

ūüėõ


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Clay with K-3

Greetings from the art room! I wanted to share the ceramic artwork my kindergarten, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd graders have been working on. All of the following projects are twists on lessons I have taught in the past so I won’t go into too much detail here, (except for 2nd grade’s turtles). Click the links below to see the step-by-step process for each project ūüôā

Kindergarten Penguins

Last year when I did penguins with my kinders we used tempera paint and glitter to paint them. I had a lot of kids request to use more colors than just black, white, and orange so this year we painted them with watercolor. I love the multi-colored designs!

1st Grade Rainbow Fish

I think I have read the Rainbow Fish out loud to kids at least a thousand times. I know all of the words to the story without even looking at the pages – it is one of my absolute favorite childhood books. This year’s 1st graders were so inspired by the beautiful sparkly illustrations. They were super excited to use¬†Sax Versa Temp Pearlescent Paint¬†and¬†Sax Versa Temp Metallic Paint¬†to paint their creations. One group ended up needing 2 class periods to paint so when they finished on the second day, they created a pyramid “habitat” for their rainbow fish.

2nd Grade Turtles

I have been collecting turtles since I was a little kid. I brought my turtle collection into school to sit on my windowsill and the kids have been going bonkers over all of them. 2nd graders were so thrilled to make their very own ceramic turtles. We began with a pinch pot which we then added features to by doing scratch & attach.

They added all kinds of cutie details like hats, bows, soccer balls, and even baby turtles. The turtles were completed with Sax Versa Temp Fluorescent Paint.

3rd Grade Animal Faces

Last year’s batch of 3rd grade animal faces came out great. I decided that it would be helpful for students to use a template for their slab so I die-cut a bunch of circles that they could trace. This ended up being super helpful to manage the size of the final clay projects.

3rd graders could choose to use the neon or the shimmery colors to paint their animal faces.

Dogs:

Unicorns:

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Cats:

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Elephants:

Lions and tigers and bears OH MY:

Dragon, Monkey, Koala:

Foxes:

A uni-bear, a spider, and a squid:

Garfield:

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The Titanic?!?!?!!!!!

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For more clay projects, check out THIS POST with 4th & 5th grade’s clay projects ūüôā

‚̧ Mrs. K

 


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Kinder Pumpkins

Kindergartners are just finishing up their pumpkin paintings so I figured I would share a few in time for Halloween. We began by reading The Legend of Spookley the Square Pumpkin which is a adorable rhyming story with gorgeous illustrations. Then, we drew pumpkins using an oval and curved lines on big white paper.

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Students painted their pumpkins by mixing red and yellow paint. The next week, we created texture on purple paper by rubbing crayons with a texture mat. Then students cut out their pumpkins and glued them. They chose a piece of green paper and drew a leaf which got cut out and glued to the stem of the pumpkin. With scrap papers they rolled little lines into a cylinder and unrolled it to make a curly spiral vine. I do not have any pictures of the process but here are some great examples of the final product:

I love these precious pumpkins!

‚̧ Mrs. K