Please Don't Eat the Artwork

ART WITH MS K


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The Day You Begin

Grade 2 did a fab job withe these little portrait paintings!

On the first day, I read the book The Day You Begin. I got this story from the book fair earlier this year because the illustrations are gorgeous and the story is wonderful. It is about how everyone is different and when we listen to each other we can understand one another and even make a new friend! I knew right away that I wanted to create an art lesson to go with this book.

This illustration was the particular inspiration for this project:

After reading the story and discussing the ways in which each of us are different, I took a pic of each student holding a big book.

The next week, students cut and glued their picture to a piece of paper and used fluorescent oil pastels to create flowing lines of movement coming out of the book. Then, they used tempera cakes to paint right over the oil pastels. This made the artwork so vibrant!

These little portraits are so sweet, they are going to look wonderful displayed in the hallway!

❤ Mrs. K

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Sculptural Self-Portraits

The idea for this project comes from @Show_me_the_monet  and Krokotak.com. When I saw these funky self-portrait sculptures I knew they would be perfect for my 2nd graders 🙂

Teacher Samples
(Made by MK)

The project required a ton of prep work on my part – I cut several different shades of “skin tone” construction paper into pieces for the face, nose, and ears. Yellow, black, and brown pieces had to be cut into manageable sizes to be used for hair. A variety of colors had to be cut up for the shirts and backgrounds. Small pieces of white paper were cut for the eyes, mouth, and details. So it was a lot of quality time spent with my handy paper cutter but it was WORTH IT!

On the first day of the project, we practiced creating 2D self-portraits in our sketch folders. I love teaching self-portraits, it is so much fun to show the students all the different ways of how to draw details of the face. Drawing is hard for young kids but it is such a great skill to learn so I encourage my students to keep a positive attitude and try their best (as usual 🙂 )

The next week, we read the book The Colors of Us which is all about diversity and how we are all different colors and all of those colors are beautiful. Students then choose a color for their background and shirt. Then they pick a neutral color that best matches their skin color. They use a big piece and make it into a rainbow for the face. They roll a small piece for the nose. It can be a circle or a tear-drop shape. We also have time to create the ears on the first day and that is pretty much it.

The next week, I show students how to make hair. I show them several different techniques of cutting, bending, folding, and gluing the paper. They get a paper that matches their hair color and create their hair style.

After creating the hair, students use crayons on a white paper to create their eyes and mouth (just like how we did in the sketch on the first day.) Then they assemble everything and add details like designs on the shirt, a background, and any accessories that they like.

It was so hard to choose just a few for this blog post because they were all so fabulous! One teacher commented that if her children had brought home this project when they were kids, she would have put it in a shadow box and kept it forever. That made my heart glow! I hope my student’s parents love them too. This will be a classic project that I will definitely be doing year after year 🙂

❤ Mrs. K


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Important People Portraits

This project AMAZING. I know I say that about all of the artwork my students make but this one is for real you guys. The process for this is based on a project from @arteiwthmrs.e. I have used rainbow scratch paper with grade 4 in the past and is is always a huge hit. I thought it would be even more fun to make it ourselves!

On the first day of the unit, we talked about portraits. Students created a sketch of a self-portrait and a sketch of a portrait of someone who is special or important to them.

Next, we had a nice chat about the color wheel and students were introduced to analogous colors. They used crayons to color hard on two pieces of white paper. After their paper was filled up with color, they painted black tempera right on top. They flippety-flopped their paintbrush over and used the handle side to scratch their portraits into the paint, revealing the beautiful colors underneath.

Students finished up the project by writing a few sentences about why they are special and why the person they chose is important to them. As always, the writing the kids produced is pure gold. Their sentiments are so sweet and quirky.

Some classes got to play a fun critique game called Criticket when they finished their work. This game really reinforced the positive thinking mindset of this project and allowed the kids to connect with each other and their artwork in a new way. One of my goals as an educator is to teach not only my curriculum but also character development and empathy as well. The reason I like this project so much is because it was driven by positive thinking about the self and others. In today’s would more than ever, that is something we all need.

❤ Mrs. K


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Daydreamin’ Doodle Portraits

5th graders created these cutie-pie portraits. I took their picture in a “daydreaming” pose. They brainstormed ideas of things that they are interested in and created symbols to represent those things. (Side note – this project was really exciting for me to teach because my thesis was all about personal symbolism and visual metaphors in artwork.)

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Teacher Sample 🙂 

 

Students cut and glued their portrait to white cardstock paper and used markers, crayons, colored pencils, twistables, and any other dry medium to create visual interest, contrast, and personal symbolism. Students also had the option of creating abstract patterns instead of symbols so there are a few of those as well.

 

This project was a bit on the easy side for 5th grade so if I do it again, I may try and make it more challenging. However they did turn out really cute and it was cool to hear some great conversations about the things that they are interested in!

❤ Mrs. K


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Positive Character Trait Self Portraits

The inspo for this project comes from Art With Lee blog.

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Third graders did a phenomenal job on this artwork! They began by creating a tissue paper background. One class was a little behind so they used tempera paint instead. Both results turned out beautiful. While the students painted with paint or tissue paper, I called them up to take their picture one by one. The pics were printed for the next week.

The next week, students cut themselves out carefully and glued their portrait to the colorful background. Then, they brainstormed positive character traits to describe themselves. This was extra fun because it coincided with their ELA unit on positive character traits. I love a good cross-curricular lesson!

They wrote their traits in marker and could use funky lettering if they wanted. Then they cut the words out and glued it to their composition. These are so outstanding!

❤ Mrs. K


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Me, Under the Sea & Sea Turtles

A few years ago I did a project with 1st grade called Me, Under the Sea. I thought it would be fun to revisit but this time with grade 2. Students began by sketching plants, animals, and a self portrait under the sea. Then, the drew on big paper and colored in their designs with crayons. The last step was to create a ‘resist’ by painting over everything with blue liquid water color.

Since I had all of the supplies out for a nice underwater resist lesson, I wanted to do a sea turtle version with my art club kids. As you can see below, the art club versions include other animals and creative ideas besides turtles.

❤ Mrs. K


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A Rainbow of My Own

As we are gearing up to put work together for our Artome art show, I realized that i completely forgot to post about first grade’s rainy day portraits. These were inspired by this blog post from Grade Onderful. I thought these would be absolutely charming for the art show and a great project to get students back into good drawing, cutting, and painting habits.

We began by drawing a rainy day landscape with white oil pastels. Students drew a horizontal line in the middle of their paper and created spirals on the bottom half and diagonal lines on the top half. Then, they painted over their lines with black, purple, and blue watercolors. They were amazed at the “magic” resist technique!

While they were painting, I called them up one by one to take their picture holding an umbrella. My assistant principal was so helpful to print all of the color photos for me — thanks Kerri-Ann!

The next week, students cut out their “selves” and glued it to their rainy background. Then, they drew and colored a rainbow which was cut out and placed above the horizon line. I think these will look terrific in the Artome frames for the art show!

The art show is Monday, December 4th from 4:30-6:30. Artwork is $25 cash or check and we will be offering reproductions as well as originals this year. Hope to see you there!

art show

❤ Mrs. K


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Sleepy Weaving

The idea for this project came from Mrs. Elder’s World of Art. We began by weaving. This is a really tough skill for kindergartners to get the hang of. I think that many of them just don’t quite yet have the fine-motor skills necessary to successfully weave in an over-under pattern. A few kids usually get the hang of it but most are usually on the struggle bus. Because of that, I always teach weaving very sloooooowly. We begin by folding a paper in half like a book. Then I walk around and draw 5 dots on each paper.

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The students write their names above the dots then draw a vertical line going down from the dots.

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Next, they “cut on the line and stop at the dot.” This essentially created a loom on which to weave.

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They cut another paper into strips and unfold their loom.

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Then, they go “over the river and under the bridge” with their “snake” to weave.

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I show them how to do the opposite for the next one so that it creates a pattern. I also tel the it is ok if all of the snakes are next to each other, it still counts as weaving!

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That pretty much took up every single second of the first day. The next day, we created a colorful background with crayons and watercolors. Some classes did not have time to do that so they just used construction paper. On the last day, I did a demo of how to draw a portrait of yourself sleeping. Students could also add a stuffed toy.

Sweet dreams, kindergartners!

❤ Ms. K


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Self-Portraits

Usually when I hang displays of artwork, the displays are homogeneous and feature the same project from a variety of different classes. I was inspired by a recent conversation about displaying artwork to mix it up a bit for kindergarten, 2nd, and 3rd grade’s self-portraits.

I had an art teacher a long time ago who always said that when displaying artwork you should mix up the projects so that viewers don’t compare the works. Each student’s work should be appreciated on it’s own and that is easier to do when the work is surrounded by a variety of projects.

Since kinder, 2nd, and 3rd grade all finished their self-portraits around the same time, I thought it would be fun to display them all together. They are so colorful and the mixture of media and methods is really awesome to see!

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I love how each one is so unique — even though the students experienced the same demonstrations and used the same materials during the process, their products are all so different!

If you are interested in seeing any of the step-by-step lessons for these self-portraits you can see kindergarten’s here, 2nd grade’s here, and 3rd grade’s here.


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First Grade Art Hands

I just love this lesson inspired by Cassie Stephens.  This project is one of my favorites to teach about texture, stamping, composition, and skin color, diversity, and love.

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This year’s batch of first graders really knocked it out of the park!