Please Don't Eat the Artwork

ART WITH MS K


Leave a comment

Pop Up Houses

These fantastic little pop-up houses were inspired by makeandtakes.com We followed their tutorial but due to time only did one story instead of 2 for our houses.

Teacher Sample by MK

On the first day, students measured and cut to make the paper pop-up for the house. They draw a triangle or a trapezoid onto a separate piece of construction paper for the roof as well as a rectangle for the door.

On the second day, students designed the background, house, and yard with fluorescent oil pastels. We read the story “Home” and students were inspired by the different textures and details from the homes in the book. They were encouraged to think about the yard with a bird’s eye view (what would it look like if a bird was flying over and looking down at the house?) We added a path, plants, windows, trees, and a sky.

On the third day, students painted over their designs with tempera cakes. They were encouraged to use colors that contrast to really make their artwork pop.

Great job 3rd graders!

❤ Mrs. K

Advertisements


Leave a comment

Paintbrush Power

Fourth graders just finished up their sculpture collages. They look fabulous displayed in the hallway!

On the first day, I read “What If” to the kids. This story is all about different ways to be creative. We had a nice little discussion about how creativity isnt just drawing and painting, it can be dancing or cooking or building. Students were inspired by the illustrations to design a colorful background with a variety of lines and colors.

We used fluorescent oil pastels to draw lines and shapes and painted over it with tempera cakes. The kids declared that it looked like an art party!

The next day, we talked about sculpture. Students were reminded that sculpture is artwork that is 3D or pop-up. Students identified and described different sculptures that they have seen. Then, each kid got a neutral piece of construction paper that best matched their skin tone. They traced their hand and cut it out.

The paintbrush was super tricky to construct. I find that many of my students are lacking fine motor skills, even in 4th grade. I believe this is because they spend so much time looking at screens that they do not get to practice making things with their hands very often. The struggle was real but we got through it with a little perseverance and try-your-best attitude.

To make the paintbrush, students carefully rolled a piece of black construction paper into a cylinder. Then they added a little glue and had to hold it until it dried a bit. The paper kept wanting to pop apart so this was also an exercise in patience. Next, students cut fringe into a small brown piece of paper and wrapped it around the black tube, gluing it carefully. The last step was to wrap and glue a small bit of aluminum foil.

The hand and paintbrush were glued to the background on the 2nd day. On the 3rd day, students used a variety of colored construction paper to create more fun pop-ups in their design.

I love project and how is celebrates the power to creativity 🙂

❤ Mrs. K


Leave a comment

Rocket Ship Sculptures

Kindergarten kiddos are wrapping up their rocket ship sculptures. They were super fun to make!

I found a tutorial video and handy printout on Krokotak.com This website has AWESOME resources!

We read the book Tiny Little Rocket and talked all about outer space. Then, each student received a black piece of construction paper and metallic colored pencils. Students created a shiny starry galaxy background.

I had copied the handout onto several colors of bright, neon card stock. Each student got a piece and used colored pencils to add little patterns and designs in each shape.

The next art class, we cut, glued, and assembled the rockets. Students were so excited to make them pop up by carefully folding or bending the paper. But the ultimate best part of this project was that students got to trade pieces with their classmates. This allowed them to create a rocket with a variety of colors. They loved this collaborative aspect!

Way to go kindergartners!

❤ Mrs. K


1 Comment

The Day You Begin

Grade 2 did a fab job withe these little portrait paintings!

On the first day, I read the book The Day You Begin. I got this story from the book fair earlier this year because the illustrations are gorgeous and the story is wonderful. It is about how everyone is different and when we listen to each other we can understand one another and even make a new friend! I knew right away that I wanted to create an art lesson to go with this book.

This illustration was the particular inspiration for this project:

After reading the story and discussing the ways in which each of us are different, I took a pic of each student holding a big book.

The next week, students cut and glued their picture to a piece of paper and used fluorescent oil pastels to create flowing lines of movement coming out of the book. Then, they used tempera cakes to paint right over the oil pastels. This made the artwork so vibrant!

These little portraits are so sweet, they are going to look wonderful displayed in the hallway!

❤ Mrs. K


Leave a comment

Sculptural Self-Portraits

The idea for this project comes from @Show_me_the_monet  and Krokotak.com. When I saw these funky self-portrait sculptures I knew they would be perfect for my 2nd graders 🙂

Teacher Samples
(Made by MK)

The project required a ton of prep work on my part – I cut several different shades of “skin tone” construction paper into pieces for the face, nose, and ears. Yellow, black, and brown pieces had to be cut into manageable sizes to be used for hair. A variety of colors had to be cut up for the shirts and backgrounds. Small pieces of white paper were cut for the eyes, mouth, and details. So it was a lot of quality time spent with my handy paper cutter but it was WORTH IT!

On the first day of the project, we practiced creating 2D self-portraits in our sketch folders. I love teaching self-portraits, it is so much fun to show the students all the different ways of how to draw details of the face. Drawing is hard for young kids but it is such a great skill to learn so I encourage my students to keep a positive attitude and try their best (as usual 🙂 )

The next week, we read the book The Colors of Us which is all about diversity and how we are all different colors and all of those colors are beautiful. Students then choose a color for their background and shirt. Then they pick a neutral color that best matches their skin color. They use a big piece and make it into a rainbow for the face. They roll a small piece for the nose. It can be a circle or a tear-drop shape. We also have time to create the ears on the first day and that is pretty much it.

The next week, I show students how to make hair. I show them several different techniques of cutting, bending, folding, and gluing the paper. They get a paper that matches their hair color and create their hair style.

After creating the hair, students use crayons on a white paper to create their eyes and mouth (just like how we did in the sketch on the first day.) Then they assemble everything and add details like designs on the shirt, a background, and any accessories that they like.

It was so hard to choose just a few for this blog post because they were all so fabulous! One teacher commented that if her children had brought home this project when they were kids, she would have put it in a shadow box and kept it forever. That made my heart glow! I hope my student’s parents love them too. This will be a classic project that I will definitely be doing year after year 🙂

❤ Mrs. K


Leave a comment

Mixed Media Solar Systems

Fourth graders did a fantastic job with these mixed media solar systems! We started this project as while they learned about planets, stars, and solar systems in science class so there were some great cross-curricular connections.

We began by looking at Starry Night and noticing the lines of movement in the night sky.

Students used liquid glue to create lines inspired by starry night on black paper. They sprinkled multi-colored glue onto the glue and placed the paper onto the drying rack. We used multi-colored glitter to represent stars that are hot and cooler, closer and far away.

The next week, we created a beautiful mono-print with ziploc bags, markers, and spray bottles. First, students colored on the bags with Mr. Sketch water based markers.

Next, they sprayed the bags a couple of times with water.

Then, they gently pressed a white paper onto the wet bag.

When the paper is carefully peeled off, it reveals a beautiful tie-dye watercolor paper. It was such a fun way to create a painting!

The next week, we read Tiny Little Rocket and had a chat about form and planetary rotation. Planets are 3D and we can make out planets look like they have form by shading. The part closer to the sun is not shaded and the part further away has a dark crescent. Students used cups to trace circles onto their painted paper and a black colored pencil to create a shaded crescent.

The next art class, students carefully cut and glued their planets onto their starry night background. They had to make sure their shaded sides were all going in the same direction and could also use scrap paper to make some planets pop up. They could also overlap planets and make some going off of the page.

This turned out to be a super fun project, the process and the product are equally successful and engaging. I love when students are able to make connections in the art room and bring their learning into other aspects of their lives 🙂

❤ Mrs. K


2 Comments

Paper Snow Globes

These little paper snow globes are the perfect one-day project right before winter break! The inspiration form this comes from Pinterest 🙂

We read the book Snowmen at Night. Students were inspired to create different scarves and hats for their snowman and they also noticed how shading a circle made it have form.

We created the designs step-by-step:

The kids did a fab job with these, almost everyone was successful and ended up with something they were super proud of. I don’t usually do such “crafty” projects but every once in a while (especially the week before winter break) it can be fun!

Happy Holidays!

❤ Mrs. K


1 Comment

Jump Frog Jump

This idea for this project comes from Young School Art Blog.  These sweet sculptures were so fun to make!

We began by reading the story Jump Frog Jump and talking about a frog’s habitat. In the picture below, they are practicing making scalloped and wavy lines on the back of their paper with black crayon. Once they got the hang of it, they used a white oil pastel to create lines on the other side of the paper. Then they pained over their lines with blue and aqua tempera cakes. The reveal of the white lines was so magical! 

The next week, students cut their water into strips ad created waved by gluing them to blue construction paper. This was a but tricky, especially if too mush glue was used but everyone was able to make it work. Students also received 4 pieces of green paper. They cut a circle out first and then cut a triangle into the circle to create a lily pad. 

The third week, students drew, traced, colored, and cut out a frog.

20181112_081808

We did a step-by step drawing like this: 

20181206_123544-ANIMATION

The frog was glued onto one of the lily pads. Torn tissue paper was crumpled to create ‘flowers’ on the other lily pads. 

I am so thrilled with how these turned out! The process was so much fun, the kids were engaged with painting, building, and drawing. Mixed media projects are the best!

❤ Mrs. K

p.s. Why is a frog always happy? 

.

.

.

.

.

They eat whatever bugs them!! 😛 


Leave a comment

Seahorses by Second Grade

Second grade loved this seahorse project inspired by Colors of My Day blog. We began by reading Eric Carle’s Mister Seahorse. Students noticed the lines and shapes used to create the illustrations.

20180918_092745

We drew wavy lines on a piece of white paper and then painted over them with cool colored tempera cakes. The kids were amazed that their crayon lines showed up through the paint.

20180809_135856

The next week, each student glued down two pieces of yarn. Then they used warm colored tissue paper to create a beautiful patchwork design.

20180912_092451

The next week, we did a step-by-step seahorse drawing on the warm colored paper. Students cut and glued it to their cool colored background and added details like seaweed, sea creatures, and even mermaids and buried treasure!

These are so precious and look great on a display with 1st grade’s Tiny Seed collages.

20181005_133506

❤ Mrs. K


1 Comment

Mouse Paint Color Wheels

Hiya!

It has been a while since I posted here. The past few months have been a whirlwind – My husband and I bought a house and moved right before school started. This school year kicked off busy, busy, busy! I get to serve all 700+ students at my school this year which means I have a packed schedule. Between lesson planning, preparing supplies, and organizing artwork, I am a busy art bee! So blogging has fallen down to the way bottom of my to-do list. Today is a teacher workday which means I finally get to knock out some of the things on that list, including updating you on what we have been working on in the art room!

There aren’t too many new things in my classroom this year. I didn’t want to revamp everything (why fix something if it ain’t broken?). However I did make a couple of helpful posters. The first one is our PBIS rules. The second poster is Types of Artwork.

Our first few projects of the school year were repeats from previous years. I am doing an Art To Remember fundraiser so I wanted to make sure the projects were tried and true. After we finished up the fundraiser projects, we jumped into some fun new things.

First graders started off with a Mouse Paint Color Wheel. We began by reading Mouse Paint and mixing colors. Students move from table to table to paint all 6 squares on their paper in an activity I like to call Carousel Painting. It is so much fun!

The next week, students used a little oval to trace their mice bodies on their painted paper. They glue them to a grey background and use crayons & colored pencils to add eyes, ears, and tails. Once complete, we make observations about the color wheel – how it goes in rainbow order, how it has a pattern of primary & secondary colors, and how it is split up of warm and cool colors.

More blog posts coming soon!

❤ Mrs. K