Please Don't Eat the Artwork

ART WITH MS K


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Pop Up Houses

These fantastic little pop-up houses were inspired by makeandtakes.com We followed their tutorial but due to time only did one story instead of 2 for our houses.

Teacher Sample by MK

On the first day, students measured and cut to make the paper pop-up for the house. They draw a triangle or a trapezoid onto a separate piece of construction paper for the roof as well as a rectangle for the door.

On the second day, students designed the background, house, and yard with fluorescent oil pastels. We read the story “Home” and students were inspired by the different textures and details from the homes in the book. They were encouraged to think about the yard with a bird’s eye view (what would it look like if a bird was flying over and looking down at the house?) We added a path, plants, windows, trees, and a sky.

On the third day, students painted over their designs with tempera cakes. They were encouraged to use colors that contrast to really make their artwork pop.

Great job 3rd graders!

❤ Mrs. K


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Paintbrush Power

Fourth graders just finished up their sculpture collages. They look fabulous displayed in the hallway!

On the first day, I read “What If” to the kids. This story is all about different ways to be creative. We had a nice little discussion about how creativity isnt just drawing and painting, it can be dancing or cooking or building. Students were inspired by the illustrations to design a colorful background with a variety of lines and colors.

We used fluorescent oil pastels to draw lines and shapes and painted over it with tempera cakes. The kids declared that it looked like an art party!

The next day, we talked about sculpture. Students were reminded that sculpture is artwork that is 3D or pop-up. Students identified and described different sculptures that they have seen. Then, each kid got a neutral piece of construction paper that best matched their skin tone. They traced their hand and cut it out.

The paintbrush was super tricky to construct. I find that many of my students are lacking fine motor skills, even in 4th grade. I believe this is because they spend so much time looking at screens that they do not get to practice making things with their hands very often. The struggle was real but we got through it with a little perseverance and try-your-best attitude.

To make the paintbrush, students carefully rolled a piece of black construction paper into a cylinder. Then they added a little glue and had to hold it until it dried a bit. The paper kept wanting to pop apart so this was also an exercise in patience. Next, students cut fringe into a small brown piece of paper and wrapped it around the black tube, gluing it carefully. The last step was to wrap and glue a small bit of aluminum foil.

The hand and paintbrush were glued to the background on the 2nd day. On the 3rd day, students used a variety of colored construction paper to create more fun pop-ups in their design.

I love project and how is celebrates the power to creativity 🙂

❤ Mrs. K


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Rocket Ship Sculptures

Kindergarten kiddos are wrapping up their rocket ship sculptures. They were super fun to make!

I found a tutorial video and handy printout on Krokotak.com This website has AWESOME resources!

We read the book Tiny Little Rocket and talked all about outer space. Then, each student received a black piece of construction paper and metallic colored pencils. Students created a shiny starry galaxy background.

I had copied the handout onto several colors of bright, neon card stock. Each student got a piece and used colored pencils to add little patterns and designs in each shape.

The next art class, we cut, glued, and assembled the rockets. Students were so excited to make them pop up by carefully folding or bending the paper. But the ultimate best part of this project was that students got to trade pieces with their classmates. This allowed them to create a rocket with a variety of colors. They loved this collaborative aspect!

Way to go kindergartners!

❤ Mrs. K


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Sculptural Self-Portraits

The idea for this project comes from @Show_me_the_monet  and Krokotak.com. When I saw these funky self-portrait sculptures I knew they would be perfect for my 2nd graders 🙂

Teacher Samples
(Made by MK)

The project required a ton of prep work on my part – I cut several different shades of “skin tone” construction paper into pieces for the face, nose, and ears. Yellow, black, and brown pieces had to be cut into manageable sizes to be used for hair. A variety of colors had to be cut up for the shirts and backgrounds. Small pieces of white paper were cut for the eyes, mouth, and details. So it was a lot of quality time spent with my handy paper cutter but it was WORTH IT!

On the first day of the project, we practiced creating 2D self-portraits in our sketch folders. I love teaching self-portraits, it is so much fun to show the students all the different ways of how to draw details of the face. Drawing is hard for young kids but it is such a great skill to learn so I encourage my students to keep a positive attitude and try their best (as usual 🙂 )

The next week, we read the book The Colors of Us which is all about diversity and how we are all different colors and all of those colors are beautiful. Students then choose a color for their background and shirt. Then they pick a neutral color that best matches their skin color. They use a big piece and make it into a rainbow for the face. They roll a small piece for the nose. It can be a circle or a tear-drop shape. We also have time to create the ears on the first day and that is pretty much it.

The next week, I show students how to make hair. I show them several different techniques of cutting, bending, folding, and gluing the paper. They get a paper that matches their hair color and create their hair style.

After creating the hair, students use crayons on a white paper to create their eyes and mouth (just like how we did in the sketch on the first day.) Then they assemble everything and add details like designs on the shirt, a background, and any accessories that they like.

It was so hard to choose just a few for this blog post because they were all so fabulous! One teacher commented that if her children had brought home this project when they were kids, she would have put it in a shadow box and kept it forever. That made my heart glow! I hope my student’s parents love them too. This will be a classic project that I will definitely be doing year after year 🙂

❤ Mrs. K


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Paper Snow Globes

These little paper snow globes are the perfect one-day project right before winter break! The inspiration form this comes from Pinterest 🙂

We read the book Snowmen at Night. Students were inspired to create different scarves and hats for their snowman and they also noticed how shading a circle made it have form.

We created the designs step-by-step:

The kids did a fab job with these, almost everyone was successful and ended up with something they were super proud of. I don’t usually do such “crafty” projects but every once in a while (especially the week before winter break) it can be fun!

Happy Holidays!

❤ Mrs. K


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Jump Frog Jump

This idea for this project comes from Young School Art Blog.  These sweet sculptures were so fun to make!

We began by reading the story Jump Frog Jump and talking about a frog’s habitat. In the picture below, they are practicing making scalloped and wavy lines on the back of their paper with black crayon. Once they got the hang of it, they used a white oil pastel to create lines on the other side of the paper. Then they pained over their lines with blue and aqua tempera cakes. The reveal of the white lines was so magical! 

The next week, students cut their water into strips ad created waved by gluing them to blue construction paper. This was a but tricky, especially if too mush glue was used but everyone was able to make it work. Students also received 4 pieces of green paper. They cut a circle out first and then cut a triangle into the circle to create a lily pad. 

The third week, students drew, traced, colored, and cut out a frog.

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We did a step-by step drawing like this: 

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The frog was glued onto one of the lily pads. Torn tissue paper was crumpled to create ‘flowers’ on the other lily pads. 

I am so thrilled with how these turned out! The process was so much fun, the kids were engaged with painting, building, and drawing. Mixed media projects are the best!

❤ Mrs. K

p.s. Why is a frog always happy? 

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They eat whatever bugs them!! 😛 


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Paper Bag Tree Sculptures

The idea for this project came from an Instagram post by @iteachart2004. Here is my teacher sample which I absolutely LOVE and am quite proud of:

Art club loved making these sculptural trees. We began with a piece of cardboard and a paper bag. The cardboard was cut to the size of the bottom of the bag. Once placed inside, the bag was twisted. The kids cut into the top and twisted the pieces to make ‘branches.’ 

After sculpting their tree, students used tempera paint to paint the base. Some kids painted the branches and quickly realized that it made the sculpture droop because it was too heavy. Next time I do this project we will make sure to just paint the base 🙂 

The next art club session, students used tissue paper to create leaves on their trees. They also began to draw and cut out their pop-up details. 

My example was fall themed and my students ran in all different directions with their own projects. Some kids made winter scenes, some made magical fairytale trees, or trees inspired by stories and mythology.

I can’t wait to do this again in the spring with the next group of Art Club kiddos. I am thinking that we will make cherry-blossom trees!

❤ Mrs. K 


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Bubble Letter Sculpture

After starting and stopping this sculpture project   with one of my 5th grade groups, I wanted to rethink the sculpture making process. I took a peek into my Mary-Poppin’s bag of a supply closet (I am always finding some crazy thing in there) and realized I had a ton of empty yarn cones. I also had a lot of pipe cleaners and colored card stock so after playing around with the materials I came up with this sculpture project.

The first day, students had to sketch out their idea and practice their bubble letters. They had to plan out what colors they would be using to paint their cones and for their letters.

The second day, they used metallic versa temp paint to paint their cones.

The next couple of classes were spent drawing and cutting out the bubble letters from colored card stock squares. The toughest part was getting the kids to draw their letters big and wide enough to be taped to a pipe cleaner. So many of the letters ripped apart or just ended up being tiny little spaghetti noodles. Why do kids draw to tiny?!

I taught the kids how to cut out negative space inside of their letters and we used tape to adhere them to pipe cleaners. One kids brilliantly discovered that if you tape the letters to each other the sculpture becomes sturdier. I just love when students problem solve to make a project better.

They could choose any school-appropriate word they want but I encouraged them to do their name, initials, or the name of something that has significant personal meaning. There ended up being an awful lot of Fortnite and Stranger Things inspired sculptures. I guess that is what the youths are into these days.

I would say the majority of these turned out great but the process was rather difficult. Perhaps with less of a time crunch we could have added more details and art knowledge into these. For the last project of their elementary school experience, the 5th grader’s did a nice job overall. Hopefully I will be able to collect enough yarn cones to do this again next year!

❤ Mrs. K


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Doodle Sculptures

A couple of months ago, I was trying to figure out a cool sculpture project to do with 5th grade. During undergrad my studio concentration was sculpture and while I enjoyed using power tools and learning how to weld, it really isn’t very applicable in and elementary school setting. I have to admit, I do not have the same passion for teaching sculpture as I do for creating it. So I really wanted to challenge myself to come up with a fun and engaging project for myself and my students. I realized that I had a ton of cardboard matboard leftover from our Artome art show earlier this year. Usually I cut it up and use it as stampers for the younger or as based for paper sculptures kids but I decided to play around and see what kind of more interesting form could be created. And voila! The idea for Doodle Sculptures was born.

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Students traced circles or created other geometric shapes onto the matboard. The neat thing about this matboard is that one side is white and one side is black. The kids cut out their shapes and used black and metallic sharpies to create some doodle designs. They had to have another shape and they cut slots into both to create a kind of X formation. I hot glued that onto a larger base shape and from there they built up their sculpture by cutting slots in each shape and carefully placing them together.

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There was no glue or tape used other than my hot glue dot which made materials really easy to manage. Here are a few of the completed projects. They don’t photograph very well because they are so interesting and “in the round” – every angle makes it look like a different piece of artwork!

That being said – I initially thought this project would be a home run but I ended up only doing it with one class. I think that the matboard was just too difficult for the students to cut through. Many of them complained that their hands hurt and it was a struggle getting all of the shapes cut out. I think that if I try this again in the future I would do this with art club or use something else to cut that is better than scissors but not as intense as an exact blade. Any ideas for me, art teachers? 🙂 

I came up with another sculpture idea for the rest of my 5th grade classes so stay tuned to see how that one turns out, so far it’s great!

❤ Mrs. K

 


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Squid Sculptures

One day I was playing around with some supplies. I drew with some Mr. Sketch Water Color markers and sprayed the paper to create a beautiful tie-dye effect. I folded and rolled the paper when it was dry and voila– a project was born. I realized the folded paper looked kinda like a squid and thought it would be a fun sculpture project. This was originally intended for 4th grade only (to be honest, it was probably way to easy for them) but since I had a 5th & 3rd grade class that were ahead of everyone else I decided to do it with them too. After trying this out with 3rd, 4th, and 5th, I think it would probably be best for 2nd/3rd. Despite the lack of challenge, most of the kids really enjoyed making these.

On the first day, we create the beautiful paper. Students were encouraged to chose a color scheme and use patterns of lines. After they finished their tie-dye paper, they created patters on a piece of construction paper.

The second day, we used a lot of office supplies. Students got a kick out of this but really they need to learn how to properly use a stapler. They cut the construction paper into strips and carefully stapled it to the bottom of the watercolor paper.

Then they rolled the paper into a cylinder and stapled it at the top and bottom. They folded two sides in like gift wrap to create the top of the squid’s head. There was a lot of peer support for this step. Seeing the kids collaborate to help their classmates be successful was pretty cool!

Two holes were punched and a string was tied on to hang it up. Then students could use googly eyes or sharpies to create eyes and a face.

These were a big hit – they all turned out super cute!

❤ Mrs. K