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ART WITH MS K


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Mouse Paint Color Wheels

Hiya!

It has been a while since I posted here. The past few months have been a whirlwind – My husband and I bought a house and moved right before school started. This school year kicked off busy, busy, busy! I get to serve all 700+ students at my school this year which means I have a packed schedule. Between lesson planning, preparing supplies, and organizing artwork, I am a busy art bee! So blogging has fallen down to the way bottom of my to-do list. Today is a teacher workday which means I finally get to knock out some of the things on that list, including updating you on what we have been working on in the art room!

There aren’t too many new things in my classroom this year. I didn’t want to revamp everything (why fix something if it ain’t broken?). However I did make a couple of helpful posters. The first one is our PBIS rules. The second poster is Types of Artwork.

Our first few projects of the school year were repeats from previous years. I am doing an Art To Remember fundraiser so I wanted to make sure the projects were tried and true. After we finished up the fundraiser projects, we jumped into some fun new things.

First graders started off with a Mouse Paint Color Wheel. We began by reading Mouse Paint and mixing colors. Students move from table to table to paint all 6 squares on their paper in an activity I like to call Carousel Painting. It is so much fun!

The next week, students used a little oval to trace their mice bodies on their painted paper. They glue them to a grey background and use crayons & colored pencils to add eyes, ears, and tails. Once complete, we make observations about the color wheel – how it goes in rainbow order, how it has a pattern of primary & secondary colors, and how it is split up of warm and cool colors.

More blog posts coming soon!

❤ Mrs. K

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Kawaii Rainbow Clouds

Kawaii means “cute” in Japanese and IMO there is really no other way to describe these little rainbow clouds! This project was inspired by a post from @oliver_artroom on Instagram. I did this with a few of my kindergarten classes and one 1st grade class. I had kids from other grades (even 4th & 5th!) beg to make one but we simply did not have time.

We began by painting a paper with rainbow stripes on the front and back. This was very revolutionary to the kids and they kept asking me “are you sure we are supposed to paint the back too!?” Yeah guys, I am sure : )

Next class, we read Little Cloud and created a cloud on card stock. Students cut their rainbow paper into strips and clued it to the cloud. We added googly eyes (or hand-drawn eyes) and a smile. Kids punched a hole in the top and tied on a piece of yarn to hang their little rainbow cloud. Aren’t the the cutest EVER?! I wanted to keep them all and hang them from the art room ceiling but I am sure that would have caused quite the uproar so I hope they are happily hanging on bedroom walls or refrigerator doors (or if it had been my parents, in the garage which was a kid’s art gallery). Enjoy!

❤ Mrs. K

 

 


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Me, Under the Sea & Sea Turtles

A few years ago I did a project with 1st grade called Me, Under the Sea. I thought it would be fun to revisit but this time with grade 2. Students began by sketching plants, animals, and a self portrait under the sea. Then, the drew on big paper and colored in their designs with crayons. The last step was to create a ‘resist’ by painting over everything with blue liquid water color.

Since I had all of the supplies out for a nice underwater resist lesson, I wanted to do a sea turtle version with my art club kids. As you can see below, the art club versions include other animals and creative ideas besides turtles.

❤ Mrs. K


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Bubble Letter Sculpture

After starting and stopping this sculpture project   with one of my 5th grade groups, I wanted to rethink the sculpture making process. I took a peek into my Mary-Poppin’s bag of a supply closet (I am always finding some crazy thing in there) and realized I had a ton of empty yarn cones. I also had a lot of pipe cleaners and colored card stock so after playing around with the materials I came up with this sculpture project.

The first day, students had to sketch out their idea and practice their bubble letters. They had to plan out what colors they would be using to paint their cones and for their letters.

The second day, they used metallic versa temp paint to paint their cones.

The next couple of classes were spent drawing and cutting out the bubble letters from colored card stock squares. The toughest part was getting the kids to draw their letters big and wide enough to be taped to a pipe cleaner. So many of the letters ripped apart or just ended up being tiny little spaghetti noodles. Why do kids draw to tiny?!

I taught the kids how to cut out negative space inside of their letters and we used tape to adhere them to pipe cleaners. One kids brilliantly discovered that if you tape the letters to each other the sculpture becomes sturdier. I just love when students problem solve to make a project better.

They could choose any school-appropriate word they want but I encouraged them to do their name, initials, or the name of something that has significant personal meaning. There ended up being an awful lot of Fortnite and Stranger Things inspired sculptures. I guess that is what the youths are into these days.

I would say the majority of these turned out great but the process was rather difficult. Perhaps with less of a time crunch we could have added more details and art knowledge into these. For the last project of their elementary school experience, the 5th grader’s did a nice job overall. Hopefully I will be able to collect enough yarn cones to do this again next year!

❤ Mrs. K


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Doodle Sculptures

A couple of months ago, I was trying to figure out a cool sculpture project to do with 5th grade. During undergrad my studio concentration was sculpture and while I enjoyed using power tools and learning how to weld, it really isn’t very applicable in and elementary school setting. I have to admit, I do not have the same passion for teaching sculpture as I do for creating it. So I really wanted to challenge myself to come up with a fun and engaging project for myself and my students. I realized that I had a ton of cardboard matboard leftover from our Artome art show earlier this year. Usually I cut it up and use it as stampers for the younger or as based for paper sculptures kids but I decided to play around and see what kind of more interesting form could be created. And voila! The idea for Doodle Sculptures was born.

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Students traced circles or created other geometric shapes onto the matboard. The neat thing about this matboard is that one side is white and one side is black. The kids cut out their shapes and used black and metallic sharpies to create some doodle designs. They had to have another shape and they cut slots into both to create a kind of X formation. I hot glued that onto a larger base shape and from there they built up their sculpture by cutting slots in each shape and carefully placing them together.

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There was no glue or tape used other than my hot glue dot which made materials really easy to manage. Here are a few of the completed projects. They don’t photograph very well because they are so interesting and “in the round” – every angle makes it look like a different piece of artwork!

That being said – I initially thought this project would be a home run but I ended up only doing it with one class. I think that the matboard was just too difficult for the students to cut through. Many of them complained that their hands hurt and it was a struggle getting all of the shapes cut out. I think that if I try this again in the future I would do this with art club or use something else to cut that is better than scissors but not as intense as an exact blade. Any ideas for me, art teachers? 🙂 

I came up with another sculpture idea for the rest of my 5th grade classes so stay tuned to see how that one turns out, so far it’s great!

❤ Mrs. K

 


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Alphabet Soup

This project is based on the one created by @2art.chambers for the Mini Matisse Blog.

Kindergartners practiced their alphabet for this scrumptious project. We began by reading Alpha Oops.  Students traced a pie pan circle onto white paper and used oil pastel to draw their letters. Using a mixture of brown, yellow, and gold liquid water color, they painted their “soup”.

Next, the kiddos picked out a piece of construction paper and used crayons to create patterns. They cut and glued their circle along with a plastic spoon (that was spray-painted silver).

Great job kindergartners!

❤ Mrs. K

 

p.s. Why couldn’t the pirate learn the alphabet?

. . . . .

. . . .

. . .

. .

He was always lost at C

😛


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Kawaii Shrinky Dinks

Every school year there is some new trend that today’s youths become obsessed with. Silly bands, One Direction, Pokemon Go, Minecraft . . . the list goes on and on. This year my 5th grade girls are absolutely obsessed with Kawaii – the culture of cuteness originating in Japan. They have clothes and accessories and school supplies. They are Kawaii crazy! And to be honest, this is a trend I am also on board with because it is so dang cute. I purchased a few drawing books on Amazon  and there are kids in my classroom almost every morning who want to practice drawing Kawaii. Its awesome!

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So I decided to do Kawaii Shrinky-Dinks with art club and another group of students. Shrinky-Dinks is a plastic sheet that you can draw on and when you put it in a toaster oven, the paper shrinks in size and grows in thickness.  I don’t have any picture of the ones my students made but here are my examples. First, I drew my design onto sketch paper. I placed the transparent Shrinky-Dink plastic over and used Sharpie to outline. I colored everything in with colored pencil. Then I cut out the designs.

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I used a hole punch to make holes so that these can be charms. They were carefully placed on a flattened brown lunch sack (rough side up!) and put into a 350 degree toaster oven for a couple minutes. It is really cool to see them shrink! You have to put the rough side up because they like to bend and the smooth side will stick to itself and become ruined.

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Twisteez Wire is used at the end to create a charm/keychain/ornament etc. (Please don’t mind the non-Kawaii psychedelic stegosaurus that snuck in there) These were such a huge hit with students and despite being rather crafty, a huge hit with me too!

❤ Mrs. K


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Moana Landscapes by 2nd Grade

The idea for this project comes from the Apex Elementary Art Blog. I wanted to start off the year for 2nd graders with a step-by-step drawing project. I often get the sense that my students are confident painters but when it comes to drawing their hesitation and doubt is very apparent. Drawing is a very difficult skill. You have to use a part of your brain that does not often get exercised to look at something and try and figure out how to remake it on your paper.  Most art media is much more forgiving and mistakes can be hidden or changed. Drawing can be frustrating for elementary kids because it is an art form in which imperfection becomes obvious very quickly.

That being said, I personally find that it is easiest to draw when using a drawing book or a youtube tutorial (lately I am obsessed with Draw with Jazza) so I wanted to bring that same experience to my students so they could gain some confidence. We began by drawing step-by-step together. The drawing was excellent for reviewing different kinds of lines and shapes and parts of a landscape (foreground, middle ground, background). Here is an animation of the steps:

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The kids drew with pencil and then traced over their lines with sharpie. We talked a lot about overlapping and size placement to show depth. A lot of students were wondering why there are flowers floating around in the foreground and I really didn’t have a good answer for them so I finally just turned on the Moana soundtrack and said that it is supposed to be from Moana. This seemed a reasonable enough answer to distract the students from the obvious weirdness of the foreground flowers. We continued the Moana jam sesh as we painted.

I love all of the unique details my students added to these whimsical landscapes like dinosaurs and sheep and houses and trees and all kinds of cutie little things.

Mrs. K