Please Don't Eat the Artwork

ART WITH MS K


Leave a comment

Sleepy Weaving

The idea for this project came from Mrs. Elder’s World of Art. We began by weaving. This is a really tough skill for kindergartners to get the hang of. I think that many of them just don’t quite yet have the fine-motor skills necessary to successfully weave in an over-under pattern. A few kids usually get the hang of it but most are usually on the struggle bus. Because of that, I always teach weaving very sloooooowly. We begin by folding a paper in half like a book. Then I walk around and draw 5 dots on each paper.

IMG_20170509_085304

The students write their names above the dots then draw a vertical line going down from the dots.

IMG_20170509_085636

Next, they “cut on the line and stop at the dot.” This essentially created a loom on which to weave.

IMG_20170509_085819

They cut another paper into strips and unfold their loom.

IMG_20170509_090110

Then, they go “over the river and under the bridge” with their “snake” to weave.

IMG_20170509_090414

I show them how to do the opposite for the next one so that it creates a pattern. I also tel the it is ok if all of the snakes are next to each other, it still counts as weaving!

IMG_20170509_090900

That pretty much took up every single second of the first day. The next day, we created a colorful background with crayons and watercolors. Some classes did not have time to do that so they just used construction paper. On the last day, I did a demo of how to draw a portrait of yourself sleeping. Students could also add a stuffed toy.

Sweet dreams, kindergartners!

❤ Ms. K

Advertisements


Leave a comment

Stitching and Pets in Art Club

This Cassie Stephens-inspired project was challenging but fun for my art club kiddos. We began by painting a piece of 12×12 cardboard with tempera paint. I showed students how to create a gradient by blending colors.

Then, students filled out the practice page to kind of get in the mindset of stitching.

IMG_20170307_150413

It was a little difficult for them to grasp the concept of creating these 2D lines in 3D space at first but with a little bit of practice, they got the hang of it. The square design was certainly the easiest but I had many students challenge themselves to create one of the more difficult designs. On the back of the cardboard, we traced a plate and created 16 notches.

IMG_20170216_151218

IMG_20170216_151250.jpg

There was a lot of peer support that happened especially when I loudly declared that I would not be tying any more knots for anybody. Students could choose any color of yarn they wanted to create their design.

As students completed their stitching, they began a quick and easy pet portrait project. I like to bookend really challenging projects with simple ones sometimes to keep motivation and morale up. The stitching proved to be SUPER challenging for some kids so I figured it was time to take it easy with a simple drawing and painting project based on this lesson.  One of my more observant and sassy 5th graders asked “isn’t that for the little kids?!” But they enjoyed it anyway 😛

Not everyone completed the pet portraits but the nice thing about art club is that the students have the memory and motivation to work on their projects for long stretches of time. They will get a chance to finish as we move into our next project of emoji plushies!

IMG_20170310_152949_372

 

 

 

 

 


Leave a comment

Self-Portraits

Usually when I hang displays of artwork, the displays are homogeneous and feature the same project from a variety of different classes. I was inspired by a recent conversation about displaying artwork to mix it up a bit for kindergarten, 2nd, and 3rd grade’s self-portraits.

I had an art teacher a long time ago who always said that when displaying artwork you should mix up the projects so that viewers don’t compare the works. Each student’s work should be appreciated on it’s own and that is easier to do when the work is surrounded by a variety of projects.

Since kinder, 2nd, and 3rd grade all finished their self-portraits around the same time, I thought it would be fun to display them all together. They are so colorful and the mixture of media and methods is really awesome to see!

IMG_20170320_090654

IMG_20170320_090713

I love how each one is so unique — even though the students experienced the same demonstrations and used the same materials during the process, their products are all so different!

If you are interested in seeing any of the step-by-step lessons for these self-portraits you can see kindergarten’s here, 2nd grade’s here, and 3rd grade’s here.


Leave a comment

Monochromatic Value Scale House Weaving Texture Landscapes

I had trouble coming up with a simple title for this project because it was so involved and included so many different standards, concepts, and techniques.

img_20160920_123318

Teacher Sample

On the first day, we used my Value Scale Handout to practice mixing tints and shades. Students also got to look at the “recipe” for the colors by playing the popsicle game.

img_4948

The next week, each table chose a primary or secondary color to use to create a value scale. Students used forks to scratch texture into their paper. For the third week, students chose a piece of construction paper that matched their value scale to create a monochromatic artwork. They used crayons and texture mats to create more visual texture.

015

The first step of building the landscape was to fold the value scale like a brochure an cut it into thirds.

016

One of those rectangles was cut as a wavy line to create the “hills” that the house is tucked into.

017

The other two rectangles were cut in half. I showed students how to create a warp and a weft and they chose papers that had a lot of contrast to weave. I showed the kids how to draw “lollipops” and told them to cut on the line and stop at the pop. This ensured that they had a decent warp that they could weave the weft pieces into. I also advised the kids to weave from the back since the lines were easier to see.

That was about as far as we got in one day. The next time we met, students cut out a roof, a chimney, and details for the sky.

Third graders will get to choose between these and their O’keeffe flowers to present in the art show in December. 🙂


Leave a comment

Woven Animals

First graders studied animals in their PBL unit this spring and I thought a woven animal would be a great cross-curricular experience! This ended up being a kind of twist on the woven alligators I have done before but with more choice and voice. I was apprehensive about this at first because it is more open ended but just like kindergartener’s clay animals  I was pleasantly surprised and extremely impressed!

006.JPG

We began by creating painted paper using the primary colors and white. We talked about mixing secondary colors and tints. Students used the other end of the paintbrush to “draw” designs, lines, and shapes into their painting.

011.JPG

The next day, we created a weaving. Students had already been studying their animals in their home room classes and were able to answer the question: What color is your animal mostly? They picked out a piece of construction paper to represent their animal and created a loom to weave. They cut their painting into strips of paper to use as the weaving pieces.

001

On the third day, we talked about how animal’s body parts are made out of shapes. We talked about the different shapes of each animal and I demonstrated how to cut and glue other pieces of construction paper to add details, even pop-up details! I think first graders did an absolutely fantastic job with these, they have so much personality and the level of engagement, excitement, and motivation was so high because of the cross-curricular connection.

Whales with curly 3D water coming out of the blow holes:

Foxes:

004 (3).JPG

Koalas:

002 (4)

Komodo dragons:

Rabbits:

003 (4)

Sharks:

005 (3)

A tree frog:

009 (2)

A jaguar:

010 (2)

And my personal fave, pink flamingos:

I can’t even describe how proud I am of the kiddos for creating these, they are absolutely magnificent!


2 Comments

Ojos de Dios

Weaving is not my favorite skill to teach. I have talked before about how I think it is kind of boring and not that creative because they are all pretty much the same. HOWEVER I am now a believer after doing this project.

IMG_20160428_125414

I was inspired by the delightfully colorful blog Art, Eat, Tie Dye, Repeat for this lesson. We began with a PowerPoint featuring examples of Ojos de Dios and some background info about the native art form. On that first day, students created a painted paper that was supposed to be used for their background (more on that later).

001.JPG

I did a demo on how to paint a galaxy and that seemed to be a very popular option! The next week when we met, each student received an X made out of popsicle sticks that they labeled with their initials and the numbers 1-4. I used regular school glue to create the Xs to give to the students but hot glue would probably work too.

Now, before I go any further I must disclaim the extreme challenge that this project was for both myself and my students. This one is kinda complicated. I had watched a couple of youtube videos to see how to do it (this is a good one even though I have no idea what she is saying this must be what my ESOL kids feel like).  I even used my specials team as guinea pigs and practiced teaching it to them (thanks guys!). One teacher pointed out that it was a lot easier to do from the underside and after  lot of trial and error, the students agreed! I taught students how to do both ways and they could choose the easier method that worked for them. There was certainly some frustration getting started but in the end, most students were incredibly proud and even asked to make another one! Anyways, back to that X –

003

Some kids needed help tying the string to the middle but most had the hang of it.So the first step is to tie the string in the middle and it doesnt really matter which numbers it is in between.

004.JPG

The pattern for weaving is “over – under – under.” Start by placing the string over one of the sticks(2).

005.JPG

Next bring it underneath that stick(2):

006

Put it under the stick next to that one as well:

007

Then place it over that same stick (1) to create a line:

008.JPG

Next, go under 1 and 4 and over 4:

009010011

Continue the pattern of “over – under – under.” Lines will start stacking up along the popsicle sticks.

012

The other side will look like a square or diamond:

013

I told students to leave about a finger’s length of string to tie on the next color.

 

Then continue the pattern. You can also weave from the front by alternating diagonals. Wrap the string around one stick then go diagonally across, then under, then across.

017018019020021

Each color added will create more lines on the back and more diamonds on the front.

 

To finish it off, tape the end of the string to the back of the popsicle stick.

 

The kids really enjoyed getting to choose their favorite colors and express themselves through color.

Now when I showed students the original plan which was to glue the weaving to the paper we created the first day, there was basically a mutiny. It turned out they wanted to have the Ojos de Dios separate. I decided that we would create envelopes with the papers instead so that they could put the Ojos in instead of on them. Students folded their paper in half and used a hole puncher to punch holes up the sides.

006.JPG

Then, they cut small pieces of yarn and tied them to create fringe. I told them not to pull too tightly on the yarn or the paper would rip. They could use 1 or 2 colors and cut the fringe to the length of their choice.

009.JPG

They could also braid yarn together to create a strap if they wanted to.

013 (2).JPG

These turned out SO COOL!!! The best part was that they were really proud of their work and super engaged. They loved the idea of creating something functional. A couple students used sequins to create a jeweled effect and one kid even wrote “MK” for a Michael Kors bag (lol)! Students who were able to make more than one weaving could glue one of their Ojos to the outside of the pouch for more decoration.

We were able to finish these just in time for Mother’s Day and many students are planning to give them as gifts! Today one student brought me a great gift – she had created a miniature one at home ❤

024


1 Comment

Value Weaving Self Portraits

What do you so when you are scrambling for an end for an end of the year project that will keep 5th graders engaged and hit some overlooked standards? You make something up and keep your fingers crossed that it isn’t a fiasco. This lesson was anything but a fiasco and one that will surely be in my bag o’ classic awesome lessons for years to come.

033

I needed something that would continue to incorporate craft techniques, touch upon value/tint/shade, and provide a way to show emphasis and contrast. I wanted to utilize skills we have learned already so that during testing and in the weeks after I wouldn’t be pushing tired minds too far but still present an interesting project. On the first day we talked about value and 5th graders painted a value scale.

007

The next way was all about weaving. Students used the fancy scissors to cut a warp and colorful construction paper for a weft. We briefly discussed color schemes and students could choose any color they wanted but were encouraged to think about their choice and perhaps even make it complementary or monochromatic.

005 012

The next day was a sketching day. We talked about emojis and students used mirrors to draw self portraits with an emoji twist. They picked their favorite to make into a final draft and traced it with sharpie. Then they added a thought or speech bubble.

009

These turned out so fabulous, I am very impressed with all of them! I love how graphic and bold these portraits are. This was the perfect project to end the school year and to end elementary art with.

037 031 032 036 030 001 028 027 038 026 039 029 035 040 041 024

I am really going to miss this year’s 5th grade class. I have known many of them since 3rd grade and it has been a joy to watch them grow into the thoughtful and amazing people they are. Overall this has been a spectacular year and I cannot believe that in a few hours I will be done with my 3rd year of teaching. I like to look back at my posts from my first year sometimes because it reminds me what a dream come true this job truly is for me. I started this year feeling a little burned out and kind of deflated but I feel like I am ending on a strong, positive note. I will be posting during the summer but for all of my kiddos who are reading — I hope you have a great summer and I will see you next year!

❤ Ms. K


2 Comments

Clay Looms

This project was inspired by It is Art Day! Check out that post for more awesome examples and step-by-step directions!

006

We began by rolling out clay into a slab and cutting out the center to make a flat donut. We used straws to poke and odd number of holes around the edge. We poked holes using cut up straws. I found that 13 or 15 holes worked best.(Make sure the holes go all the way through! I had a batch that I forgot to double check and no amount of stabbing at the stoneware clay would make a hole appear. Luckily I had made several extras so it was all good!)  It was also helpful to make 2 of the holes kind of off the the side in order to designate where to hang it. Texture was added with stamps and other tools.

011

After the looms went through the bisque kiln, we used oil pastels and water colors to design.

002

First, color on the clay with an oil pastel.

003

You can paint right on top with water colors to create a really lovely resist.

004

We used twisty wires and pony beads to make a place to hang it up.

005 006

Next is the really tricky part. It took over an entire class to do this step by step and 5th graders definitely had to practice some patience and perseverance but we made it! I found that the easiest way to explain this was to use the analogy of a clock or a bicycle wheel with spokes. I did not have 5th graders label theirs like I have in the following pictures but I definitely will next year!

007

Begin by tying a knot at 12 or 13 o’clock. Make sure the other end of the yarn has some tape around it to it doesn’t fray. I told my kiddos to make it look like a shoelace.

009 008

Next, put the other end through a hole that is on the opposite side. This was pretty important because not everybody had a “6 o’clock” that was directly opposite from the top hole. I told students to just choose whichever one was closer. In my example I went to 7 o’clock:

011 (2)

Then, we “walk around the clock”. Go from 7 to 1.. . .

013

Go from 1 to 8. . .

014

Go from 8 to 2 to 9. . .

015

After the first few steps some students start to understand the pattern. I tell those students to work ahead and finish and then they become my helpers and assist students who may be struggling. I demonstrated the steps on a doc cam and had some students working on the carpet looking at the board and other students in small groups at their tables. After every step I tried to circulate around the room at least once and help out kiddos who needed. Eventually we went all the way around:

017

This last part is pretty tricky and I ended up doing it for most of the students. Basically you have to make sure you have an odd number of “spokes” going around the wheel. If you for some reason do not have an odd number, skip a hole or go through a hole twice and kind of finagle it to make it happen. You take the end of the string and put it through the center underneath the top layer and gather up all the spokes and shift them to the middle. (I wish I could have snapped better picture of this but it makes a lot more sense if you try it out for yourself!)

018

Tie a knot in the middle and make sure everything is centered! Then snip off the ends.

019

024 (2)

 

When you go to weave, make sure you do it from the front. You can tell the front from the back because the front lo0ks symmetrical and the back looks like a bunch of lines.

001

To begin weaving, tie a new piece of yarn on any string in the middle and go around and around: over, under, over, under. When you run out of that color, tie a new color to the end and keep going.

026 (2) 027

I think these turned out fabulous and the even though the process was challenging, the kids ended up loving it!

022 007 009 008 021

 


Leave a comment

Bugs on Rugs by Kindergarten

Kindergarteners learned all about the art of weaving and the process of mixing colors when they made bugs on rugs. We began by making textured painted paper.

009

024

 

The loom was colorful construction paper and the process of weaving was quite a challenge but Kindergarteners did an excellent job trying their very best. The last week, we cut frayed edges and used bug stamps on the rugs.

020

Students also decorated and assembled parts for a bug and identified bugs as living things (yay cross-curricular!)

019

 

Great job kindergarteners!

031 033 028 005 004 002 035 001 030

🙂

 


6 Comments

Art in Israel

This summer I had the opportunity to travel to Israel for 10 days with a program called Birthright. It was a whirlwind adventure of hiking, food, friends, sunshine, desert, bus rides, history, and culture. In short — it was incredible.

1009936_10100951591165697_1561440281_n

Israel is a country full of natural and man-made beauty and I was so excited to see so much art everywhere — especially public art all over mostly in the form of monuments or commemorations.

IMG_20130624_051836

 

The architecture is beautiful; especially in Jerusalem where all of the building are made out of limestone.

IMG_20130621_022707 110

 

IMG_20130621_025552

The columns, arches, and aqueducts are Roman inspired. Walking through Jerusalem felt like traveling back in time a couple of millenia. The stone streets were smooth weathered with hundreds and hundreds of years of wandering feet.

IMG_20130620_075751

Check out this awesome mosaic:

IMG_20130621_183726

We went to the room where The Last Supper (supposedly) took place:

IMG_20130621_022616

The mystical city of Tzfat is famous for artists and musicians. There were plenty of both selling art or playing music in the streets.

IMG_20130620_061212

A harpist playing the harp under a statue of a harpist playing a harp:

IMG_20130621_022451

 

This is a beautiful and intricately carved wooden ark where the Torah is kept. This was in an old Synagogue that was also filled with beautiful stained glass windows.

IMG_20130620_062313

A stained glass window with the “tree of life” symbol:

IMG_20130620_062540

 

tzedakah or charity box outside the synagogue:

IMG_20130620_061428

The amazing waxworks in a small candle shop (made by weaving wax — WOW!) :

IMG_20130620_064142

We got to meet and talk to one artist named Avraham. He was so inspiring and creative! Here he is in his studio shop:

IMG_20130620_075244

Beautiful contemporary Kabbalistic art:

IMG_20130620_075133

If you know me in real life, you know that I absolutely love street art. Tel Aviv and Jerusalem had some really cool tags and graffiti.

IMG_20130620_174935

 

 

IMG_20130627_070717 IMG_20130627_092741

 

 

One very special art related moment occurred at the top of Mount Herzl (the military cemetery). A woman had an easel set up and she was painting a gorgeous landscape with oil paints. It was such a beautiful moment for an artist on top of a mountain in the sun.

IMG_20130624_050713

 

Israel is full of vibrant art. From street art to monuments, from paintings to architecture there is creativity throughout the country.And the beauty doesn’t stop at man-made — there is plenty of artistic and natural beauty.

Masada:

IMG_20130624_225659

 

The Dead Sea:

IMG_20130624_072722 IMG_20130624_095000

 

The desert:

IMG_20130625_093413 121 140

Gardens:

IMG_20130623_121359 IMG_20130625_054841

 

 

And of course the marketplace!:
106 104 103

I enjoyed every minute of my time in Israel and I cannot wait to go back and continue to explore such a vividly beautiful country. I am excited to use my experience as inspiration for my own art and to inform my teaching through understanding of other cultures. 🙂

048

IMG_20130624_223142